CoreRise Comay Venus Pro 3 SSD E-mail
Reviews - Featured Reviews: Storage
Written by Olin Coles   
Thursday, 24 May 2012
Table of Contents: Page Index
CoreRise Comay Venus Pro 3 SSD
Closer Look: Comay Venus Pro 3
Features and Specifications
SSD Testing Methodology
AS-SSD Benchmark
ATTO Disk Benchmark
CrystalDiskMark 3.0 Tests
Iometer IOPS Performance
EVEREST Disk Benchmark
PCMark Vantage HDD Tests
Comay Venus Pro 3 SSD Conclusion

CoreRise Comay Venus Pro 3 SSD Review

Manufacturer: CoreRise Electronics Co., Ltd.
Product Name: Comay Premium SSD
Model Number: Venus Pro 3

Full Disclosure: The product sample used in this article has been provided by CoreRise.

Suzhou CoreRise Electronics Corporation is new to the industry, but they're starting off big. As the 91st manufacturer to join the Solid State Drive industry, CoreRise introduced themselves into the market back in 2010 with an Indilinx-based SSD, and have returned to expand their product family using LSI-SandForce technology for the new Comay Venus Pro 3 SSD. Designed for the SATA 6 GB/s interface, Venus Pro 3 features 555 MB/s reads and 525 MB/s writes of compressed data. CoreRise advertises the Comay Venus Pro 3 to produce 4KB random read IOPS up to 40,000, and write up to 85,000 IOPS. In this article, Benchmark Reviews tests the CoreRise Comay Venus Pro 3 SSD against the fastest storage devices available.

LSI-SandForce's second-generation SF-2281 SSD processor maintains all of the original core technology introduced in the SF-1200 series, but now improves performance with 20% faster IOPS and 40% faster sequential read/write throughput. They've enhanced BCH ECC capability, and the new processors now support ATA-7 Security Erase. Finally, the new SF-2200 series implements cost-effective 20nm-class NAND flash from all leading flash vendors with Asynch/ONFi1/ONFi2/Toggle interfaces.

For many within the industry, LSI-SandForce was considered in control of the 2010 consumer storage market in much the same way that Indilinx did in 2009. The difference now is that LSI-SandForce's platform offers several technical benefits that the old Indilinx Barefoot platform was not capable of. Well into 2012, the SSD landscape is approximately the same, but with some interesting new twists. Benchmark Reviews confirms that 2nd-generation LSI-SandForce processors are keeping up with their past reputation, using performance tests on the Intel SATA 6Gb/s controller.

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Solid State vs Hard Disk

Despite decades of design improvements, the hard disk drive (HDD) is still the slowest component of any personal computer system. Consider that modern desktop processors have a 1 ns response time (nanosecond = one billionth of one second), while system memory responds between 30-90 ns. Traditional hard drive technology utilizes magnetic spinning media, and even the fastest spinning mechanical storage products still exhibit a 9,000,000 ns / 9 ms initial response time (millisecond = one thousandth of one second). In more relevant terms, the processor receives the command and must then wait for system memory to fetch related data from the storage drive. This is why any computer system is only as fast as the slowest component in the data chain; usually the hard drive.

In a perfect world all of the components operate at the same speed. Until that day comes, the real-world goal for achieving optimal performance is for system memory to operate as quickly as the central processor and then for the storage drive to operate as fast as memory. With present-day technology this is an impossible task, so enthusiasts try to close the speed gaps between components as much as possible. Although system memory is up to 90x (9000%) slower than most processors, consider then that the hard drive is an added 1000x (100,000%) slower than that same memory. Essentially, these three components are as different in speed as walking is to driving and flying.

Solid State Drive technology bridges the largest gap in these response times. The difference a SSD makes to operational response times and program speeds is dramatic, and takes the storage drive from a slow 'walking' speed to a much faster 'driving' speed. Solid State Drive technology improves initial response times by more than 450x (45,000%) for applications and Operating System software, when compared to their mechanical HDD counterparts. The biggest mistake PC hardware enthusiasts make with regard to SSD technology is grading them based on bandwidth speed. File transfer speeds are important, but only so long as the operational IOPS performance can sustain that bandwidth under load.

Bandwidth Speed vs Operational Performance

As we've explained in our SSD Benchmark Tests: SATA IDE vs AHCI Mode guide, Solid State Drive performance revolves around two dynamics: bandwidth speed (MB/s) and operational performance (IOPS). These two metrics work together, but one is more important than the other. Consider this analogy: bandwidth determines how much cargo a ship can transport in one voyage, and operational IOPS performance is how fast the ship moves. By understanding this and applying it to SSD storage, there is a clear importance set on each variable depending on the task at hand.

For casual users, especially those with laptop or desktop computers that have been upgraded to use an SSD, the naturally quick response time is enough to automatically improve the user experience. Bandwidth speed is important, but only to the extent that operational performance meets the minimum needs of the system. If an SSD has a very high bandwidth speed but a low operational performance, it will take longer to load applications and boot the computer into Windows than if the SSD offered a higher IOPS performance.



 

Comments 

 
# RE: CoreRise Comay Venus Pro 3 SSDDoug Dallam 2012-05-31 21:55
Pretty amazing. How long did it take for storage devices to catch up to the SATA 3 standard? Now after only a couple of years, storage devices are already near saturation for SATA6. LOL totally amazing. This thing can transfer 30GB/minute.

It will still be a wait for USB 3 devices to catch up to the USB 3.0 saturation rate so we can see the benefit of USB3 to something as fast as this device. I can't wait to see CF flash or something similar come into line with the USB3 theoretical. Most cards never got past a little over half of the USB2 specs.
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# RE: CoreRise Comay Venus Pro 3 SSDDoug Dallam 2012-05-31 21:58
Olin,

You say this drive is expensive, but I didn't see a price in the review.
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# lower pricesalfresco 2012-06-01 05:55
I don't think now is a good time to be entering any 'expensive' SSD into the market.

Yesterday I saw a sub 140 240GB Vertex3 in the wild. I paid more than that (170) for my 128GB Samsung 830 only 6 months ago.
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# pricesalfresco 2012-06-01 08:11
Those ^ are UK pounds
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