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Written by Hank Tolman   
Monday, 26 March 2012
Table of Contents: Page Index
ASUS Rampage IV Formula Gene Motherboard
Closer Look: ASUS Rampage IV Gene
Rampage IV Gene Detailed Features
Motherboard Features and Specifications
Motherboard Testing Methodology
AIDA64 Extreme Edition Tests
PCMark Vantage Tests
CINEBENCH R11.5 Benchmarks
CPU-Dependent 3D Gaming
PassMark PerformanceTest
Media Encoding Benchmarks
SPECviewperf 11 Tests
SPECapc Lightwave
Blender and POV-Ray
ROG X79 Express Motherboard Final Thoughts
ASUS Rampage IV Gene Conclusion

PassMark PerformanceTest 7.0

The PassMark PerformanceTest allows you to objectively benchmark a PC using a variety of different speed tests and compare the results to other computers. PassMark comprises a complete suite of tests for your computer, including CPU tests, 2D and 3D graphics tests, disk tests, memory tests, and even tests to determine the speed of your system's optical drive. PassMark tests support Hyper-Threading and systems with multiple CPUs, and allow you to save benchmark results to disk (or to export them to HTML, text, GIF, and BMP formats).

Knowledgeable users can use the Advanced Testing section to alter the parameters for the disk, network, graphics, multitasking, and memory tests, and created individual, customized testing suites. But for this review I used only the built-in CPU tests, which aren't configurable. The CPU tests comprise a number of different metrics. The first three I'll look at are integer performance, floating point performance, and a benchmark that finds prime numbers.

ASUS_Rampage_IV_Passmark.png

Now we'll take a look at SSE and Encrypt performance.

ASUS_Rampage_IV_Passmark2.png

SSE stands for "Streaming SIMD Extensions", and describes instructions that handle multiple chunks of data per instruction (SIMD = Single Instruction Multiple Data). SSE instructions work on single-precision floating point data and are typically used in graphical computations. SSE was Intel's response to AMD's "3D Now", which itself was a response to Intel's MMX instructions.

ASUS_Rampage_IV_Passmark3.png

Let's move onto some more real-world applications.



 

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