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Written by Olin Coles   
Tuesday, 01 November 2011
Table of Contents: Page Index
Seagate Barracuda 3TB Hard Drive ST3000DM001
Features and Specifications
Drive Testing Methodology
AS-SSD Benchmark
ATTO Disk Benchmark
CrystalDiskMark 3.0 Tests
Iometer IOPS Performance
EVEREST Disk Benchmark
PCMark Vantage HDD Tests
Seagate Barracuda Conclusion

EVEREST Disk Benchmark

Many enthusiasts are familiar with the Lavalys EVEREST benchmark suite (now named AIDA), but very few are aware of the Disk Benchmark tool available inside the program. The EVEREST Disk Benchmark performs linear read and write bandwidth tests on each drive, and can be configured to use file chunk sizes up to 1MB (which speeds up testing and minimizes jitter in the waveform). EVEREST Disk Benchmark does not require a partition to be present for testing, so all of our benchmarks are completed prior to drive formatting. Linear disk benchmarks are superior bandwidth speed tools in my opinion, because they scan from the first physical sector to the last. A side affect of many linear write-performance test tools is that the data is erased as it writes to every sector on the drive.

These high-capacity storage products were tested with EVEREST Disk Benchmark and connected to the Intel SATA 6Gb/s controller to use a 1MB block size option. Because these hard drives offer 3000 gigabytes of data storage capacity, the test run took a very long time to complete. Nevertheless, the waveform performance chart illustrates data speed stability across every platter. Ironically, both tests resulted in identical average and maximum speeds. This test finishes in a draw, with no advantage given to either drive.

Everest-Read-Seagate-Barracuda-XT-3TB-HDD-ST33000651AS.png

Seagate Barracuda XT 3TB Hard Drive ST33000651AS (Five-Platter)

Everest-Read-Seagate-Barracuda-3TB-HDD-ST3000DM001.png

Seagate Barracuda 3TB Hard Drive ST3000DM001 (Three-Platter)

In the next section we use PCMark Vantage to test real-world performance...



 

Comments 

 
# RE: Seagate Barracuda 3TB Hard Drive ST3000DM001Doug Dallam 2011-11-01 13:36
I just finished retesting my two Western Digital Caviar 640 Blacks and used a lot of the same tools you did. (My reasons weren't to compare this drive but other tests I was doing unrelated.)

One of the things I wanted to do was test using real files. I chose to use a folder with 6GB of jpg/RAW/and video files. I then compressed that entire folder into a solid RAR archive and tested with that as well. Synthetic benches are fun, but real world file transfers can tell a different story.

All in all a tight review, but I'm wondering why you didn't test the drive using real files, say reading from an SSD and writing to it?
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# RE: RE: Seagate Barracuda 3TB Hard Drive ST3000DM001Olin Coles 2011-11-01 13:53
I could have used real files, but felt I already had enough tests completed to illustrate performance. When you use real files, they must be the exact same files every time. Compressed files (mov/avi/mpg/etc) also skew results depending on the SSDs used.
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# RE: Seagate Barracuda 3TB Hard Drive ST3000DM001Doug Dallam 2011-11-01 14:07
When you say "skew" results, you mean because SSDs take into consideration compressible files as opposed to uncompromisable files? If so, that's why I created a compressed RAR file and the folder with loose files in it. It would have just been nice to see two real world file transfer scenarios, as per above. Maybe I'm off base here. If so, disregard.
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# Uncontrolled VariabilityBruce 2011-11-01 18:09
I've done some comparisons like this during my NAS tests: "Instead of one 10 GB file, the green portion of the chart shows what happens when transferring 4,793 items totaling 6.5GB from the PC to the NAS. If you're going to use any NAS for basic backup duties, this is the kind of action it's going to see." My informal tests showed that the real-world examples introduced too much variation in the results, making comparisons difficult and/or misleading.

Still, I get your point, and I also wish there was a way to use a standardized set of test files, that everyone could agree on.
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# RE: Uncontrolled VariabilityDoug Dallam 2011-11-02 03:30
Since here only two drives were being compared to each other, the same files could have been used for both drives. One, as explained above, multiple file, and the other one large file. Because as you point out, drives act differently depending on what is being transferred.

I suppose you could save those same files and use them to test other drives also, albeit, with the same drive and rig set up. Or, one could test a number of drives using the same files on any rig, as long as the host drive, to prevent bottlenecking, is faster than the drive being tested. That SSD Olin tested recently would have been a good contender for the host drive, since it is the fastest SSD currently commercially available to the public.
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# RE: Seagate Barracuda 3TB Hard Drive ST3000DM001ersan 2011-11-30 04:40
does this drive work with sata 2 raid controllers?
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# RE: RE: Seagate Barracuda 3TB Hard Drive ST3000DM001Olin Coles 2011-11-30 08:54
Yes, SATA 6Gb/s is backwards compatible with SATA 3Gb/s and 1.5Gb/s.
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# Sales RepDavid carr 2012-01-30 07:53
I have both the Workstation and the Sabertooth motherboards with the P55 chipset and if they are the same as the X79 the Sabertooth compared to the Workstation are the same my p55's. The Sabertooth was able to OC 300 mhz more then the workstation 4.3Ghz for the Workstation comaper to the Sabertooth able to clock to 4.6Ghz.
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