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Patriot Pyro SE Solid State Drive E-mail
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Written by Olin Coles   
Monday, 05 December 2011
Table of Contents: Page Index
Patriot Pyro SE Solid State Drive
Closer Look: Patriot Pyro SE
Features and Specifications
SSD Testing Methodology
AS-SSD Benchmark
ATTO Disk Benchmark
CrystalDiskMark 3.0 Tests
Iometer IOPS Performance
EVEREST Disk Benchmark
PCMark Vantage HDD Tests
Patriot Pyro SE SSD Conclusion

Patriot Pyro SE SSD Conclusion

IMPORTANT: Although the rating and final score mentioned in this conclusion are made to be as objective as possible, please be advised that every author perceives these factors differently at various points in time. While we each do our best to ensure that all aspects of the product are considered, there are often times unforeseen market conditions and manufacturer changes which occur after publication that could render our rating obsolete. Please do not base any purchase solely on our conclusion, as it represents our product rating specifically for the product tested which may differ from future versions. Benchmark Reviews begins our conclusion with a short summary for each of the areas that we rate.

Compared to toggle and asynchronous components used in older products, synchronous NAND flash used in new products like the Patriot Pyro SE represent the future of consumer-level solid state drives. Not only are these components fast, but they maintain better performance throughout the product's lifetime. Compared to toggle and asynchronous NAND flash, synchronous components resist performance degradation as storage capacity is filled. Add this to an already-impressive SandForce SF-2281 solid state processor, and there's a good chance you'll have enough speed and performance to last the drive's lifetime.

Our performance rating considers how effective the Patriot Pyro SE solid state drive performs in transfer operations against competing storage solutions. For reference, SandForce specifies the SF-2281 with 500 MB/s read and write, which Patriot increases to 550 MB/s read and 520 write maximum speeds for this SSD model. In our storage benchmark tests, the 240GB Patriot Pyro SE solid state drive (model PPSE240GS25SSDR) performed at or above this speed, and outperformed most other SATA-based SSD's. Our test results demonstrated the Patriot Pyro SE was good for delivering 558/528 MB/s peak read and writes speeds using ATTO Disk Benchmark SSD speed tests. Linear file transfers with Everest Disk Benchmark produced 486/471 MB/s, which exceeds performance of the OCZ Vertex 3 Max IOPS Edition SSD.

The Patriot Pyro SE SSD sent to us for testing is advertised to deliver 80,000 maximum combined IOPS, although it is unclear what tools and configuration were used to produce this particular figure. Using a SandForce-provided configuration for our own Iometer operational performance tests, we used a queue depth of 32 outstanding I/O's per target to produce 76,745 combined IOPS performance. Iometer proved that the Patriot Pyro SE could outperform nearly every other SandForce SF-2200 based SSD product, while also competing with OCZ's Vertex 3 Max IOPS Edition. In the 4K 32QD tests with AS-SSD and CrystalDiskMark, the Patriot Pyro SE SSD continued to trail the premium Vertex 3 Max IOPS Edition SSD.

Patriot-Pyro-SE-SSD-PPSE240GS25SSDR-Package.jpg

Solid State Drives are low-visibility products: you see them just long enough to install and then they're forgotten. Like their Hard Disk Drive counterparts, Solid State Drives are meant to place function before fashion. Anything above and beyond a simple metal shell is already more than what's expected in terms of the appearance. Patriot has created a back-to-basics look with the painted black finish on their Pyro SE-series SSDs, a swift departure from the anodized red finish of their eye-catching Inferno SSD series. As solid state storage controllers become faster and more advanced, heat dissipation through the enclosure walls may demand that chassis designs become more beneficial than they previously needed to be. This isn't the case yet, and a metal chassis suits SandForce SSDs nicely.

Construction is probably the strongest feature credited to any solid state product line, and the Patriot Pyro SE series is no exception. Solid State Drives are by nature immune to most abuses because of their architecture and technology, but the hard metal shell adds a superfluous level of protection. Offering a three-year product warranty, the Patriot Pyro SE series protects consumers should anything go wrong after the purchase. If a Patriot Pyro SE product does happen to fail during the 3-year warranty period, end-users can take advantage of free tech support by calling 1-800-800-9600 in the USA or completing a Patriot Customer Service Request Form. It's a good practice to first contact the retail outlet where the product was purchased for return authorizations, as they could possibly offer quicker turn-around times.

As of December 2011, the following models and prices were available online:

  • 60GB Patriot Pyro SE - Model PPSE60GS25SSDR: $117 (Amazon) / $130 (Newegg)
  • 120GB Patriot Pyro SE - Model PPSE120GS25SSDR: $205 (Newegg) / $215 (Amazon)
  • 240GB Patriot Pyro SE - Model PPSE240GS25SSDR: $470 (Newegg) / $470 (Amazon)

Patriot compliments their pricing with periodic discounts and/or rebates. At the time of this writing, the 240GB Patriot Pyro SE cost $410 after $60 rebate.

Built with synchronous NAND flash components and a second-generation SandForce SF-2281 SSD processor, Patriot's Pyro SE solid state drive delivers native TRIM garbage collection and basic SMART support with an impressive 558 MB/s read speed and nearly 78,000 IOPS. More importantly, SandForce DuraClass technology adds their proprietary RAISE and DuraWrite features not available to other SSDs, and the end result is a product that could last up to five times longer with less wear on NAND flash modules. Our testing of the Patriot Pyro SE demonstrated impressive performance across every benchmark, often rivaling the OCZ Vertex 3 series or outperforming OCZ's Max IOPS Edition. The asking price may seem higher than competing models, but discounts and rebates restore Patriot's competitive edge. Price notwithstanding, there's a lot of great features in the Patriot Pyro SE that make it an excellent SSD storage solution worthy of any notebook and desktop computer.

Pros:Benchmark Reviews Golden Tachometer Award

+ Outstanding 558/528 MBps read/write speed with ATTO
+ TCG OPAL security with 256-bit AES encryption
+ Uses synchronous NAND flash components
+ SandForce SF-2281 processor supports TRIM, SMART, and RAISE
+ DuraWrite technology extends NAND lifetime
+ Enthusiast-level operational I/O performance
+ 3-Year Patriot product warranty support
+ 60/120/240GB high-speed SSD storage capacities
+ Lightweight compact storage solution
+ Resistant to extreme shock impact
+ Low power consumption may extend battery life

Cons:

- Patriot previously offered a five-year warranty
- Expensive enthusiast-level product

Ratings:

  • Performance: 9.75
  • Appearance: 8.75
  • Construction: 9.75
  • Functionality: 9.50
  • Value: 7.25

Final Score: 9.0 out of 10.

Excellence Achievement: Benchmark Reviews Golden Tachometer Award.

Benchmark Reviews invites you to leave constructive feedback below, or ask questions in our Discussion Forum.


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Comments 

 
# SweetMergatroid 2011-12-12 16:32
I've owned a Patriot Inferno for almost a year now and it's been very reliable. The Pyro looks like it's continuing a solid reputation for a quality product.

Great review, and I enjoyed reading about your benchmark selections and reasoning. This latest generation of SSDs sure provide amazing performance.
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# Comparison Between Modelsredwolfe_98 2011-12-16 10:49
i would have liked to have seem a comparison of the performance of the 60 GB, the 120 GB and the 240 GB models of the patriot pyro SSD's.. i understand that if all of those were not provided, then they couldn't be tested.. from what i have seen, there can be big differences between the smaller and larger capacity SSD's..

to me, the prices on the patriot pyro SSD's look good, compared to what i have seen with other SSD's, which, incidentally, are too expensive, for me..
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# RE: Comparison Between ModelsOlin Coles 2011-12-16 13:47
Thanks for your comment. To be honest, I would have liked to receive one of every capacity so they could be tested as well. Sadly, that's not how these manufacturers send samples. In terms of maximum performance the differences are very small, but those differences get big once the NAND gets filled (but not with the Pyro SE series because it uses synchronous NAND flash components).
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# RE: Patriot Pyro SE Solid State Driveredwolfe_98 2011-12-16 10:54
to add to my last post (since i can't edit it), i should have said that the price on the 120 GB unit looks good, to me.. the price on the 240 GB unit is comparible to those from other vendors, which is too expensive for me..
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# Dudemjpatter63 2012-01-07 17:29
Nice review. You should test these on AMD chipsets/mobos. You will get very different results, not only with the Pyro SE but all of the Sandforce controller used SSD'd. I have tested the Kingston HyperX and Vertex 3 Max IOPS and the Pyro SE. With compressed sequential data they get similar results as the SSD's on Intel chipsets using iStor. On an AMD board ( I've tested on SB850 and 9 series chipsets, using the AMD sata controller) and the 4K, 4KQD32, and especially random reads drops to 60% less than the Intel boards. The SSD's that have worked best for me and test well across the board are the Crucial C30, M4(Marvell contr) and Samsung 830(Samsung Contr.)These were 120gb drives. Just my findings for the AMD folks out there.
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# Re: SB850Shanon 2012-01-17 20:26
I agree with this comment as far as the need for testing hardware on more than one platform. Did you notice any stability issues when testing the Crucial M4 or the Samsung 830 on the SB850? I've been looking at both of these SSD's, after having experienced the "disappearing drive" issue with the OCZ Vertex 3 (which I've come to understand as a compatibility issue between the Sandforce Controller and the SB850). I'd love to add a 256GB SSD as the application drive for my system, but not enough to have to upgrade my mobo (and consequently my CPU): I just built this system 7 months ago.
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# Mr.Tim 2012-01-17 15:39
"after only a few minutes I was booting from a restored Windows 7 System Image"
Can I assume that if I have already done a W7 install on a HD that I can use this procedure to move W7 over to the ssd if I purchase one? I am new to W7 and system image? Currently all I have installed on a new build is the W7 OS..Thanks

Do you reply to email also??? or do I check back here...guess I will find out if you respond to my email...preferred...thanks
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# RE: Mr.Olin Coles 2012-01-17 15:47
Yes, you can clone from a hard drive to the SSD without re-installing Windows. See here:
benchmarkreviews.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=439
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# OffsetMergatroid 2012-01-17 17:28
SSDs requite a particular "offset" for the format. If this offset is not correct, you can end up writing to two blocks instead of one for every write, which will kill performance and reduce the lifespan of the SSD.

Some imaging software is offset aware for SSDs and some is not. If your software does not work properly with an SSD and you create a hard drive image, when you restore the image to the SSD you will have the wrong offset.

Some imaging software will use whatever offset is in the image. Under these conditions a restore will provide the wrong offset. If the image was made from an SSD in the first place, then it should restore the correct offset.

Some imaging software has been updated so that it will use the correct offset when restoring even a hard drive image to an SSD.

This all depends on the software. You MUST check your software and if necessary contact the publisher and find out how it handles offsets. If you restore a hard drive image to an SSD with the incorrect offset, as far as I know the only way to correct it is to completely do a fresh install of Windows 7. I have seen people claim they can correct the offset after an incorrect image restore, but I tried it and the performance was not what it should have been. I had to load the recovery console, command line interface and run the diskpart software to format the drive and apply the correct offset.

All that can be avoided in two ways:
1: Do a fresh clean install to begin with and windows 7 will do everything correctly.

or

2: Create and restore your hard drive image using image software that is SSD offset aware.
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# Re Offsetspitcake 2013-03-06 15:00
AS SSD Benchmark will tell you if the drive's not aligned to 4k boundaries. If that happens, best to purchase Paragon Alignment tool.
handy to have for anyone playing with SSD's, and you re-use it once you buy it. There's other ways to re-align, but for $30 the Paragon Tool will save you a lot of headaches.
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