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X79 Express Motherboard Performance Comparison E-mail
Reviews - Featured Reviews: Motherboards
Written by David Ramsey   
Tuesday, 22 November 2011
Table of Contents: Page Index
X79 Express Motherboard Performance Comparison
X79 Express Chipset
Motherboard Feature Comparison
Motherboard Testing Methodology
Overclocking Results
SiSoft Sandra Memory Bandwidth
AIDA64 Extreme Edition Tests
PCMark Vantage Tests
CINEBENCH R11.5 Benchmarks
CPU-Dependent 3D Gaming
PassMark PerformanceTest
Media Encoding Benchmarks
SPECviewperf 11 Tests
SPECapc Lightwave
Blender and POV-Ray
Final Thoughts and Conclusion

AIDA64 Extreme Edition Tests

AIDA64 is a full 64-bit benchmark and test suite utilizing MMX, 3DNow! and SSE instruction set extensions, and will scale up to 32 processor cores. An enhanced 64-bit System Stability Test module is also available to stress the whole system to its limits. For legacy processors all benchmarks and the System Stability Test are available in 32-bit versions as well. Additionally, AIDA64 adds new hardware to its database, including 300 solid-state drives. On top of the usual ATA auto-detect information the new SSD database enables AIDA64 to display flash memory type, controller model, physical dimensions, and data transfer performance data. AIDA64 v1.00 also implements SSD-specific SMART disk health information for Indilinx, Intel, JMicron, Samsung, and SandForce controllers.

All of the benchmarks used in this test— Queen, Photoworxx, ZLib, hash, and AES— rely on basic x86 instructions, and consume very little system memory while also being aware of Hyper-Threading, multi-processors, and multi-core processors. Of all the tests in this review, AIDA64 is the one that best isolates the processor's performance from the rest of the system. While this is useful in that it more directly compares processor performance, readers should remember that virtually no "real world" programs will mirror these results.

aida64.png

The Queen and Photoworxx tests are synthetic benchmarks that iterate the function many times and over-exaggerate what the real-world performance would be like. The Queen benchmark focuses on the branch prediction capabilities and misprediction penalties of the CPU. It does this by finding possible solutions to the classic queen problem on a chessboard. At the same clock speed theoretically the processor with the shorter pipeline and smaller misprediction penalties will attain higher benchmark scores.

Like the Queen benchmark, the Photoworxx tests for penalties against pipeline architecture. The synthetic Photoworxx benchmark stresses the integer arithmetic and multiplication execution units of the CPU and also the memory subsystem. Due to the fact that this test performs high memory read/write traffic, it cannot effectively scale in situations where more than two processing threads are used, so quad-core processors with Hyper-Threading have no real advantage. The AIDIA64 Photoworxx benchmark performs the following tasks on a very large RGB image:

  • Fill
  • Flip
  • Rotate90R (rotate 90 degrees CW)
  • Rotate90L (rotate 90 degrees CCW)
  • Random (fill the image with random colored pixels)
  • RGB2BW (color to black & white conversion)
  • Difference
  • Crop

The ASUS boards are neck-and-neck at stock speeds, a phenomenon we'll see repeated through the remainder of this review. The Intel board with its beta BIOS trails very slightly behind.

aida64_zlib_hash.png

Here is something we'll see occasionally on other tests: despite being clocked 200MHz lower than the Sabertooth, the P9X79 Deluxe turns in a better overclocked score on the Hash benchmark.

aida64_aes.png

Intel's Clarksdale and subsequent CPUs have dominated the AES test due to their Advanced Encryption Standard New Instructions (AES-NI), which dramatically accelerate AES code. The Sabertooth wins here, with stock-clocked results about 10% better than the Intel DX79SI. Surprisingly, overclocks don't help this benchmark much.

Let's move on to the PCMark Vantage benchmark.



 

Comments 

 
# light and confortableCHARLEYAM 2011-11-23 08:58
SWEET WHAT YOU GOING TO DO WITH THE ONES YOUR BENCH TESTING WHEN YOUR DONE??? I WOULD LIKE TO RIDE THIS MACHINE TO ITS LIMITS AND BACK. REALLY GREAT CHIPSET AND SECOND GENERATION PROCESSORS ARE OUT OF THIS WORLD INTEL GREAT JOB GUYS AND MOTHERBOARD COMPANIES KEEP THE X79 CHIPSET ON THE MBS SO WE CAN TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THESE NEW CHIPS
HAPPY HOLIDAYS DUDES DUDETTES AND ALL OTHER LIFE FORMS ON THIS PLANET...PEACE OUT BYE BYE
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# RE: light and confortableDavid Ramsey 2011-11-23 09:01
I'll probably use the X79 Sabertooth for upgrading my personal Intel machine, and keep the Intel board for future testing (if they ever release a new BIOS, anyway!)
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# RE: X79 Express Motherboard Performance Comparisonodiebugs 2011-11-30 23:10
I see Asus still using the FAILED garbage Marvell 9128. Can't wait to see if they lie about the pci-e 3.0 like they did with the TRUE Sata 3, which is Sata 2. Good idea blowing heat onto the usb and sata port.
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# RE: RE: X79 Express Motherboard Performance ComparisonDavid Ramsey 2011-12-01 09:03
Well, bear in mind that the PCI-E 3.0 is a function of the Intel X79 Express chipset. The actual status of this feature seems a little fuzzy right now: it hasn't been "officially" certified and nobody can test it yet since there are no PCI-E 3.0 cards to test it against.
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