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Written by Olin Coles   
Monday, 15 August 2011
Table of Contents: Page Index
OCZ RevoDrive 3 X2 PCI-E Solid State Drive
Closer Look: OCZ RevoDrive 3 X2 SSD
Features and Specifications
SSD Testing Methodology
AS-SSD Benchmark
ATTO Disk Benchmark
CrystalDiskMark 3.0 Tests
Iometer IOPS Performance
EVEREST Disk Benchmark
PCMark Vantage HDD Tests
OCZ RevoDrive 3 X2 Conclusion

SSD Testing Methodology

Solid State Drives have traveled a long winding course to finally get where they are today. Up to this point in technology, there have been several key differences separating Solid State Drives from magnetic rotational Hard Disk Drives. While the DRAM-based buffer size on desktop HDDs has recently reached 64 MB and is ever-increasing, there is still a hefty delay in the initial response time. This is one key area in which flash-based Solid State Drives continually dominates because they lack moving parts to "get up to speed".

However the benefits inherent to SSDs have traditionally fallen off once the throughput begins, even though data reads or writes are executed at a high constant rate whereas the HDD tapers off in performance. This makes the average transaction speed of a SSD comparable to the data burst rate mentioned in HDD tests, albeit usually lower than the HDD's speed.

Comparing a Solid State Disk to a standard Hard Disk Drives is always relative; even if you're comparing the fastest rotational spindle speeds. One is going to be many times faster in response (SSDs), while the other is usually going to have higher throughput bandwidth (HDDs). Additionally, there are certain factors which can affect the results of a test which we do our best to avoid.

SSD Testing Disclaimer

Early on in our SSD coverage, Benchmark Reviews published an article which detailed Solid State Drive Benchmark Performance Testing. The research and discussion that went into producing that article changed the way we now test SSD products. Our previous perceptions of this technology were lost on one particular difference: the wear leveling algorithm that makes data a moving target. Without conclusive linear bandwidth testing or some other method of total-capacity testing, our previous performance results were rough estimates at best.

Our test results were obtained after each SSD had been prepared using DISKPART or Sanitary Erase tools. As a word of caution, applications such as these offer immediate but temporary restoration of original 'pristine' performance levels. In our tests, we discovered that the maximum performance results (charted) would decay as subsequent tests were performed. SSDs attached to TRIM enabled Operating Systems will benefit from continuously refreshed performance, whereas older O/S's will require a garbage collection (GC) tool to avoid 'dirty NAND' performance degradation.

It's critically important to understand that no software for the Microsoft Windows platform can accurately measure SSD performance in a comparable fashion. Synthetic benchmark tools such as HD Tach and PCMark are helpful indicators, but should not be considered the ultimate determining factor. That factor should be measured in actual user experience of real-world applications. Benchmark Reviews includes both bandwidth benchmarks and application speed tests to present a conclusive measurement of product performance.

Test System

  • Motherboard: ASUS P8P67 EVO (Intel P67 Sandy Bridge Platform, B3 Stepping)
  • Processor: Intel Core i7-2600K 3.4 GHz Quad-Core CPU
  • System Memory: 4GB Dual-Channel DDR3 1600MHz CL6-6-6-18
  • SATA 6Gb/s Storage HBA: Integrated Intel P67 Controller
    • AHCI mode - Intel Rapid Storage Technology Driver 10.1.0.1008
  • SATA 3Gb/s Storage HBA: Integrated Intel P67 Controller
    • AHCI mode - Intel Rapid Storage Technology Driver 10.1.0.1008
  • Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Ultimate Edition 64-Bit with Service Pack 1

Storage Hardware Tested

The following storage hardware has been used in our benchmark performance testing, and may be included in portions of this article:

Test Tools

  • AS SSD Benchmark 1.6.4067.34354: Multi-purpose speed and operational performance test
  • ATTO Disk Benchmark 2.46: Spot-tests static file size chunks for basic I/O bandwidth
  • CrystalDiskMark 3.0.1a by Crystal Dew World: Sequential speed benchmark spot-tests various file size chunks
  • Iometer 1.1.0 (built 08-Nov-2010) by Intel Corporation: Tests IOPS performance and I/O response time
  • Lavalys EVEREST Ultimate Edition 5.50: Disk Benchmark component tests linear read and write bandwidth speeds
  • Futuremark PCMark Vantage 1.02: HDD Benchmark Suite tests real-world drive performance

Test Results Disclaimer

This article utilizes benchmark software tools to produce operational IOPS performance and bandwidth speed results. Each test was conducted in a specific fashion, and repeated for all products. These test results are not comparable to any other benchmark application, neither on this website or another, regardless of similar IOPS or MB/s terminology in the scores. The test results in this project are only intended to be compared to the other test results conducted in identical fashion for this article.



 

Comments 

 
# RE: OCZ RevoDrive3 X2 SuperScale PCI-E SSDAdam 2011-08-16 15:35
Those speeds are absolutely insane, cant wait for this level of SSD to filter down into the more affordable drives.

Not that it's of any real importance but would be interested to know just how quickly this could boot into Win7.
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# presRick 2011-08-23 19:45
hello
@ OCZ They say three min.
Wow
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# RE: presAdam 2011-08-24 10:19
Ehm, do you mean seconds rather then minutes?

In which case, hot # that's fast.
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# it is fastRay 2011-09-04 04:45
i bought the first gen 120GB (x1) last year which is only 1xRAID0
(550MB/sec) ... windows 7 64 boots in around 24seconds
(ASUS Rampage III Extreme & Intel Core I7 980x at 4GHz)
Also bought several X2 series for my workstations at office, they
do almost the same startup times for windows - dont think it will get
any faster than this but hey - getting my fist coffe takes longer
than 24secs so i dont care!
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# RE: OCZ RevoDrive3 X2 SuperScale PCI-E SSDAthlonite 2011-08-22 23:56
240GB: RVD3X2-FHPX4-240G $2,549.95NZD
480GB: RVD3X2-FHPX4-480G $3,304.81NZD

for that sort of money I could buy 4x 120GB SSD's + an x4 PCIe SAS/SATA6Gbps raid controller for $1,866.07 and I'd still have plenty of money left over for a really descent PC to put it in
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# RE: RE: OCZ RevoDrive3 X2 SuperScale PCI-E SSDYokoyhama 2011-08-27 01:32
The 240GB is here around ?580,- that should be around 970NZD.

#tweakers.net/pricewatch/287789/ocz-revodrive-3-x2-pci-express-ssd-240gb-240gb.html#tab:prices

I don't know how much they will charge you for shipping it to New Zealand:P
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# RE: RE: RE: OCZ RevoDrive3 X2 SuperScale PCI-E SSDAthlonite 2011-08-30 00:47
tweakers.net is in German and they show ?590 which = NZD $1,021.68 and that's still stupidly more than I'm willing to spend even without PnP added
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# RE: RE: OCZ RevoDrive3 X2 SuperScale PCI-E SSDDoug Dallam 2011-08-30 00:17
LMAO! That's funny and on point.
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# RE: OCZ RevoDrive3 X2 SuperScale PCI-E SSDAthlonite 2011-08-23 00:14
so this is a plus "+ SandForce SF-2281 processor supports TRIM, SMART, and RAISE"

but this is a minus "- SCSI architecture prohibits TRIM with Windows OS"

why even mention the + if it doesn't work
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# RE: RE: OCZ RevoDrive3 X2 SuperScale PCI-E SSDOlin Coles 2011-08-23 07:23
It works, just not with the current Microsoft Windows driver. There are other operating systems that could be used, and Windows could offer support in the future.
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# RE: RE: RE: OCZ RevoDrive3 X2 SuperScale PCI-E SSDAthlonite 2011-08-24 02:08
So isn't that another minus ie: hopeless for use with Windows as it wont last long without the use of Trim
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# Not really that fastBill 2011-08-23 06:58
In real use, a computer would rarely if ever reach 64 que depth. Usually its just 1 or 2 but mostly 1 with a quick SSD. The quicker the drive the lower the QDepth in real use. So the real number is probably a QDepth of 1, testing with a high QDepth gives irrelevant numbers if your focus is real use. This Revo drive is no faster than my Vertex 2 SSD in "real use".
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# RE: Not really that fastDavid Ramsey 2011-08-23 08:06
It depends on what your "real use" is. Sitting in your desktop machine, probably not much difference. Sitting in a database server being hit by 100 users, yeah, it's going to make a difference.
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# RE: RE: Not really that fastMORINGA 2011-09-08 04:05
Yeah, damn right!
However, in this article, I wonder which SATA controller would throw up 3 or 6 GB/s...it's 3 or 6 Gb/s afaik. On the other hand, the 8 GB/s of an 8x v2.0 PCI-x are more or less enough for those beasts...
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# RE: RE: RE: Not really that fastMORINGA 2011-09-08 04:07
PCI-e, not PCI-x. I'm falling asleep this morning.
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# lofty acquisition indeedrealneil 2011-08-23 08:37
Would really like to own one of these, but it's so far out of the range of my spending that I'll probably not have one until they're old news, replaced by something far larger and much faster.
I do have a few OCZ 'Agility' and 'Solid' SSD's and I'm happy with their performance and prices.
I see OCZ as a good choice in SSD technology.
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# OCZ RevoDrive3 X2Killy 2011-09-18 23:33
Pretty good review on this drive. I've been considering this one for my first SSD based i7 2600 desktop and you guys have sold me one.Costs only about AU $660 (for the 240 GB one). I expect this to be a very good asset for a video editing app. Cheers.
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