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OCZ Octane SATA 6 Gb/s Indilinx Everest SSD E-mail
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Written by Olin Coles   
Tuesday, 21 February 2012
Table of Contents: Page Index
OCZ Octane SATA 6 Gb/s Indilinx Everest SSD
Closer Look: OCZ Octane SSD
Features and Specifications
SSD Testing Methodology
AS-SSD Benchmark
ATTO Disk Benchmark
CrystalDiskMark 3.0 Tests
Iometer IOPS Performance
EVEREST Disk Benchmark
PCMark Vantage HDD Tests
OCZ Octane SSD Conclusion

EVEREST Disk Benchmark

Many enthusiasts are familiar with the Lavalys EVEREST benchmark suite, but very few are aware of the Disk Benchmark tool available inside the program. The EVEREST Disk Benchmark performs linear read and write bandwidth tests on each drive, and can be configured to use file chunk sizes up to 1MB (which speeds up testing and minimizes jitter in the waveform). Because of the full sector-by-sector nature of linear testing, Benchmark Reviews endorses this method for testing SSD products, as detailed in our Solid State Drive Benchmark Performance Testing article. However, Hard Disk Drive products suffer a lower average bandwidth as the capacity draws linear read/write speed down into the inner-portion of the disk platter. EVEREST Disk Benchmark does not require a partition to be present for testing, so all of our benchmarks are completed prior to drive formatting.

Linear disk benchmarks are superior bandwidth speed tools in my opinion, because they scan from the first physical sector to the last. A side affect of many linear write-performance test tools is that the data is erased as it writes to every sector on the drive. Normally this isn't an issue, but it has been shown that partition table alignment will occasionally play a role in overall SSD performance (HDDs don't suffer this problem).

Everest-Read-OCZ-Octane-SSD.png

The high-performance storage products we've tested with EVEREST Disk Benchmark are connected to the Intel P67-Express SATA 6Gb/s controller and use a 1MB block size option. Read performance on the OCZ Octane solid state drive measured average speeds of 489.1 MB/s, with a relatively close maximum peak speed of 496.6 MB/s. These results are virtually identical to the OCZ Vertex 3 Max IOPS Edition and Intel SSD 520 Series drives we recently tested. Everest linear write-to tests were next...

Everest-Write-OCZ-Octane-SSD.png

The waveform chart below illustrates how well the OCZ Octane manages file transfers, and makes linear write performance appears relatively uneven. The results seen here are consistent with most other SSD products we've tested in the past that use a DRAM cache buffer. The OCZ Octane solid state drive recorded an average linear write-to speed of 288.8 MB/s, with maximum performance reaching 371.2 MB/s.

The chart below shows the average linear read and write bandwidth speeds for a cross-section of storage devices tested with EVEREST:

Everest-Disk-Benchmark_Results.png

Linear tests are an important tool for comparing bandwidth speed between storage products - although HDD products suffer performance degradation over the span of their areal storage capacity. Linear bandwidth certainly benefits the Solid State Drive, since there's very little fluctuation in transfer speed. This is because Hard Disk Drive products decline in performance as the spindle reaches the inner-most sectors on the magnetic platter, away from the fast outer edge.

In the next section we use PCMark Vantage to test real-world performance...



 

Comments 

 
# PRICErealneil 2012-02-24 06:12
SSD's still cost too much. I have a few small ones, but cannot afford the larger, better performing drives yet.
Once they get their prices down, (by more than a little) they will have an explosion in sales.
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# Smaller SSDs are affordableMergatroid 2012-02-25 17:28
I agree that the larger SSDs are still too expansive. However, the smaller sized units (120 Gb and smaller) work great as boot drives. They really speed up your o/s. They're also big enough to put your favorite apps on and really give them a speed boost. I can't speak for anyone but myself, but I really don't need to have all my storage sped up (in fact, most of my movies, music and archives are on a NAS anyway).
However, I had a 60Gb Patriot Inferno SSD that was a pretty good boot drive, and all I could afford (~250 MB/s). A year later I added another in a RAID 0 and got quite the speed boost (not only in benchmarks, but boot times and load times for games and apps). If anyone had an older SATA II SSD but can't afford to purchase a larger drive, look around for another SATA II SSD for a RAID (make sure your board supports hardware RAID, not software). I wouldn't recommend this for people who already own an SATA III SSD since they're already fast, however you could add another in RAID 0 if you wanted to increase the size of your boot drive using a RAID volume without paying the higher cost for a larger drive.
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# RE: OCZ Octane SATA 6 Gb/s Indilinx Everest SSDsteve white 2012-02-27 02:10
Colin....maybe I'm not reading your review right but
the IOPS of 35,000 is less than half that of half a
dozen other SATA 111 SSD's on the market that are 40%
cheaper.
I've just ordered a Corsair 120Gb Force GT series 3
and admittedly is a very small temporary storage drive it's
IOPS is 85,000 and 4K sequential read is 550Mb/s and writes at
515Mb/s. Price $234 Aussie dollars.
Currently my 300Gb velociraptor (10,000rpm) is really showing
it's age and is holding the system back.
Any info I want to keep long term I burn onto 25Gb Blu-ray
media and catalogue.
I would be in heaven if I owned OCZ's Vertex 3 X2 hybrid
drive but the price right now is just too high, even if it
is the quickest out there.
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# RE: RE: OCZ Octane SATA 6 Gb/s Indilinx Everest SSDOlin Coles 2012-02-27 07:29
I'm guessing that you read it wrong, since you didn't get my name right.

At any rate, Octane is a plenty-fast SSD that's ideal for users like yourself. If you're running a database server on your system, then IOPS will matter. If you're just running standard applications, you won't notice a difference.
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# Network-capableJohnny-Cakes 2012-03-02 21:30
Colin - I appreciate your feedback on the OCZ Octane SSD card mentioned. Steve White said he bought a Corsair SSD that has and IOPS of 85k, but your comment says that the Octane SSD (at 35k IOPS) is ideal for him. Not sure I understand your feedback that indicates that IOPS matters, and if so, why would the Octane card at 35k IOPS be ideal for him when he has an SSD that does 85k IOPS?

Sorry, I am kind of a newbie looking to upgrade to a new SATA III board and SDD that is at least 300Gig, and don't understand your recommendation?

I don't run a database server on my system (and don't anticipate doing so on the new system), so I'm trying to get my hands around what is a worthwhile investment if i use standard applications plus a couple games like COD MW3, that may benefit from SSD performance?

I am currently under the impression that moving from my Raptor 10k rpm HDD to ANY ssd drive is a move in the right direction, but am thinking a really don't need to be paying the premium to get the highest performing SSD, since per your comment, I'm mostly using standard apps that won't realize much benefit. If COD MW3 is the most demanding app I use, should I even be looking at SSD at this point?
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# Any SSD is sweetMergatroid 2012-03-03 02:02
Even an SATA II SSD would get you 250 MB/s or more. A good SATA III SSD should net you around 500 MB/s.

Any SSD will blow the doors off any mechanical hard drive. Personally, I don't think how demanding the app is should be your deciding factor. I think you should look more at boot times and sheer performance in load times. I could only afford 120G worth of SSD (2 x 60GB in a RAID 0), but my system flies now, and I have installed the games I play the most on this volume and the performance difference is unreal. My system boots in about 15 seconds now. If you're looking at a 300G SSD, you'll get a pretty highly performing unit. It will cost a fair amount, but the performance increase will justify it easily.
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# Fast, while they last...WangoTango 2012-05-02 15:35
I bought 4 of the 512GB OCTANE drives and have had 2 fail, in different laptops. One just flat out died and the other acts as if it is being hot swapped, comes and goes, usually goes. One is off on an RMA now, getting ready to start a trouble ticket on the other. Got me so spooked that I replaced one critical drive with a Crucial 512GB. Got my fingers crossed on the other two units.
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