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OCZ Octane SATA 6 Gb/s Indilinx Everest SSD E-mail
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Written by Olin Coles   
Tuesday, 21 February 2012
Table of Contents: Page Index
OCZ Octane SATA 6 Gb/s Indilinx Everest SSD
Closer Look: OCZ Octane SSD
Features and Specifications
SSD Testing Methodology
AS-SSD Benchmark
ATTO Disk Benchmark
CrystalDiskMark 3.0 Tests
Iometer IOPS Performance
EVEREST Disk Benchmark
PCMark Vantage HDD Tests
OCZ Octane SSD Conclusion

Iometer IOPS Performance

Iometer is an I/O subsystem measurement and characterization tool for single and clustered systems. Iometer does for a computer's I/O subsystem what a dynamometer does for an engine: it measures performance under a controlled load. Iometer was originally developed by the Intel Corporation and formerly known as "Galileo". Intel has discontinued work on Iometer, and has gifted it to the Open Source Development Lab (OSDL). There is currently a new version of Iometer in beta form, which adds several new test dimensions for SSDs.

Iometer is both a workload generator (that is, it performs I/O operations in order to stress the system) and a measurement tool (that is, it examines and records the performance of its I/O operations and their impact on the system). It can be configured to emulate the disk or network I/O load of any program or benchmark, or can be used to generate entirely synthetic I/O loads. It can generate and measure loads on single or multiple (networked) systems.

To measure random I/O response time as well as total I/O's per second, Iometer is set to use 4KB file size chunks over a 100% random sequential distribution at a queue depth of 32 outstanding I/O's per target. The tests are given a 50% read and 50% write distribution. While this pattern may not match traditional 'server' or 'workstation' profiles, it illustrates a single point of reference relative to our product field.

All of our SSD tests used Iometer 1.1.0 (build 08-Nov-2010) by Intel Corporation to measure IOPS performance, using a SandForce-created QD30 configuration: 4KB 100 Random 50-50 Read and Write.icf. The chart below illustrates combined random read and write IOPS over a 120-second Iometer test phase, where highest I/O total is preferred:

Iometer_Random_4K-IOPS_30QD_Results.png

In our Iometer tests, which is configured to use 32 outstanding I/O's per target and random 50/50 read/write distribution, SandForce SSDs generally outperform the competition when tested with this large queue depth. The latest SATA 6Gb/s storage solutions lead the pack, and while the 240GB OCZ Vertex 3 Max IOPS Edition is on top with 83,117 IOPS this 512GB OCZ Octane solid state drive produced a modest 21,775 peak combined IOPS. This isn't the highest I/O device we've ever tested by any means, but it's still far beyond the needs of multi-tasking power users and hardcore gamers.

In our next section, we test linear read and write bandwidth performance and compare its speed against several other top storage products using EVEREST Disk Benchmark. Benchmark Reviews feels that linear tests are excellent for rating SSDs, however HDDs are put at a disadvantage with these tests whenever capacity is high.



 

Comments 

 
# PRICErealneil 2012-02-24 06:12
SSD's still cost too much. I have a few small ones, but cannot afford the larger, better performing drives yet.
Once they get their prices down, (by more than a little) they will have an explosion in sales.
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# Smaller SSDs are affordableMergatroid 2012-02-25 17:28
I agree that the larger SSDs are still too expansive. However, the smaller sized units (120 Gb and smaller) work great as boot drives. They really speed up your o/s. They're also big enough to put your favorite apps on and really give them a speed boost. I can't speak for anyone but myself, but I really don't need to have all my storage sped up (in fact, most of my movies, music and archives are on a NAS anyway).
However, I had a 60Gb Patriot Inferno SSD that was a pretty good boot drive, and all I could afford (~250 MB/s). A year later I added another in a RAID 0 and got quite the speed boost (not only in benchmarks, but boot times and load times for games and apps). If anyone had an older SATA II SSD but can't afford to purchase a larger drive, look around for another SATA II SSD for a RAID (make sure your board supports hardware RAID, not software). I wouldn't recommend this for people who already own an SATA III SSD since they're already fast, however you could add another in RAID 0 if you wanted to increase the size of your boot drive using a RAID volume without paying the higher cost for a larger drive.
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# RE: OCZ Octane SATA 6 Gb/s Indilinx Everest SSDsteve white 2012-02-27 02:10
Colin....maybe I'm not reading your review right but
the IOPS of 35,000 is less than half that of half a
dozen other SATA 111 SSD's on the market that are 40%
cheaper.
I've just ordered a Corsair 120Gb Force GT series 3
and admittedly is a very small temporary storage drive it's
IOPS is 85,000 and 4K sequential read is 550Mb/s and writes at
515Mb/s. Price $234 Aussie dollars.
Currently my 300Gb velociraptor (10,000rpm) is really showing
it's age and is holding the system back.
Any info I want to keep long term I burn onto 25Gb Blu-ray
media and catalogue.
I would be in heaven if I owned OCZ's Vertex 3 X2 hybrid
drive but the price right now is just too high, even if it
is the quickest out there.
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# RE: RE: OCZ Octane SATA 6 Gb/s Indilinx Everest SSDOlin Coles 2012-02-27 07:29
I'm guessing that you read it wrong, since you didn't get my name right.

At any rate, Octane is a plenty-fast SSD that's ideal for users like yourself. If you're running a database server on your system, then IOPS will matter. If you're just running standard applications, you won't notice a difference.
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# Network-capableJohnny-Cakes 2012-03-02 21:30
Colin - I appreciate your feedback on the OCZ Octane SSD card mentioned. Steve White said he bought a Corsair SSD that has and IOPS of 85k, but your comment says that the Octane SSD (at 35k IOPS) is ideal for him. Not sure I understand your feedback that indicates that IOPS matters, and if so, why would the Octane card at 35k IOPS be ideal for him when he has an SSD that does 85k IOPS?

Sorry, I am kind of a newbie looking to upgrade to a new SATA III board and SDD that is at least 300Gig, and don't understand your recommendation?

I don't run a database server on my system (and don't anticipate doing so on the new system), so I'm trying to get my hands around what is a worthwhile investment if i use standard applications plus a couple games like COD MW3, that may benefit from SSD performance?

I am currently under the impression that moving from my Raptor 10k rpm HDD to ANY ssd drive is a move in the right direction, but am thinking a really don't need to be paying the premium to get the highest performing SSD, since per your comment, I'm mostly using standard apps that won't realize much benefit. If COD MW3 is the most demanding app I use, should I even be looking at SSD at this point?
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# Any SSD is sweetMergatroid 2012-03-03 02:02
Even an SATA II SSD would get you 250 MB/s or more. A good SATA III SSD should net you around 500 MB/s.

Any SSD will blow the doors off any mechanical hard drive. Personally, I don't think how demanding the app is should be your deciding factor. I think you should look more at boot times and sheer performance in load times. I could only afford 120G worth of SSD (2 x 60GB in a RAID 0), but my system flies now, and I have installed the games I play the most on this volume and the performance difference is unreal. My system boots in about 15 seconds now. If you're looking at a 300G SSD, you'll get a pretty highly performing unit. It will cost a fair amount, but the performance increase will justify it easily.
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# Fast, while they last...WangoTango 2012-05-02 15:35
I bought 4 of the 512GB OCTANE drives and have had 2 fail, in different laptops. One just flat out died and the other acts as if it is being hot swapped, comes and goes, usually goes. One is off on an RMA now, getting ready to start a trouble ticket on the other. Got me so spooked that I replaced one critical drive with a Crucial 512GB. Got my fingers crossed on the other two units.
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