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Reviews - Featured Reviews: Motherboards
Written by Hank Tolman   
Monday, 02 May 2011
Table of Contents: Page Index
ASUS Sabertooth P67 B3 TUF Motherboard
The Intel P67 Express Chipset
Closer Look: ASUS Sabertooth P67
Sabertooth P67 Detailed Features
ASUS UEFI (BIOS)
ASUS Sabertooth P67 Overclocking
Sabertooth P67 Specifications
Motherboard Testing Methodology
AIDA64 Extreme Edition v1.1 Benchmark Tests
Passmark Performance Test
PCMark Vantage Benchmarks
SiSoftware Sandra
Cinebench R11.5 Benchmarks
Video Transcoding Tests
Street Fighter IV Benchmark
ASUS Sabertooth P67 Conclusion

AIDA64 Extreme Edition v1.1 Benchmark Tests

In November, 2010, FinalWire acquired and discontinued Lavalys EVEREST, updated it, and released it as AIDA64. AIDA64 is an industry leading system diagnostics and benchmarking solution for enthusiasts PC users, based on the award-winning EVEREST Technology. During system optimizations and tweaking it provides essential system and overclock information, advanced hardware monitoring and diagnostics capabilities to check the effects of the applied settings. CPU, FPU and memory benchmarks are available to measure the actual system performance and compare it to previous states or other systems. Furthermore, complete software, operating system and security information makes AIDA64 a comprehensive system diagnostics tool that offers a total of 100 pages of information about your PC.

All of the benchmarks used in our test bed rely on basic x86 instructions and consume very low system memory while also being aware of HyperThreading, multi-processors, and multi-core processors. While the AIDA64 CPU tests really only compare the processor performance more than it measures platforms, it still offers a glimpse into what kind of power each platform possesses.

Queen and Photoworxx tests are synthetic benchmarks that operate the function many times and over-exaggerate by several magnitudes what the real-world performance would be like. The Queen benchmark focuses on the branch prediction capabilities and misprediction penalties of the CPU. It does this by finding possible solutions to the classic queen problem on a chessboard. At the same clock speed theoretically the processor with the shorter pipeline and smaller misprediction penalties will attain higher benchmark scores.

ASUS_Sabertooth_P67_AIDA1.png

Like the Queen benchmark, the Photoworxx tests for penalties against pipeline architecture. The synthetic Photoworxx benchmark stresses the integer arithmetic and multiplication execution units of the CPU and also the memory subsystem. Due to the fact that this test performs high memory read/write traffic, it cannot effectively scale in situations where more than two processing threads are used. The AIDA64 Photoworxx benchmark performs the following tasks on a very large RGB image:

  • Fill
  • Flip
  • Rotate90R (rotate 90 degrees CW)
  • Rotate90L (rotate 90 degrees CCW)
  • Random (fill the image with random colored pixels)
  • RGB2BW (color to black & white conversion)
  • Difference
  • Crop

ASUS_Sabertooth_P67_AIDA2.png

The Zip Library test measures combined CPU and memory subsystem performance through the public ZLib compression library. ZLib is designed as a free lossless data compression library for use on virtually any computer hardware and operating system. The ZLib data format is itself portable across platforms and has a footprint independent of input data that can be reduced at some cost in compression.

ASUS_Sabertooth_P67_AIDA3.png

The AES integer benchmark measures CPU performance using AES data encryption. It utilizes Vincent Rijmen, Antoon Bosselaers and Paulo Barreto's public domain C code in ECB mode and consumes 48 MB of memory.

ASUS_Sabertooth_P67_AID4.png

In our next section we take a look at the results of the Passmark Performance Test.



 

Comments 

 
# Plastic plateChrisH 2011-05-06 17:30
Thanks for another strong review. As the board has a distinctive plastic compound plate dividing transistor and other components from the rest of the board and case, I was looking for not just a board review but also to see what this TUF divider did to heating / cooling. Just by looking at it many will think it works opposite to what is stated. That shielding may be one thing aye, GPU & CPU are main heat sources but is that only half the equation? The second half of the equation is transistor / component heat generation and what about facilitating airflow under the plate, how is this dissipated? Thirdly, is the 25% in rating really required because under the plastic it is hotter there? I like 25% better "quality" components and am dissapointed this standard isn't on their top boards anyhow. Fourthly, dependng on your case fans what effect do case fans have have this plastic plate. I guess because there hasn't been any substantial comment you think that it is no bigge what goes on below plate but if so why isn't it recommended for all boards then?
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# Plastic plateChrisH 2011-05-06 17:34
Sorry * Fourthly, dependng on your case fans what effect do case fans have have this plastic plate. Should be Fourthly, dependng on your case fans what effect do case fans have below this plastic plate.
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# RE: ASUS Sabertooth P67 B3 TUF MotherboardMACK 2011-05-07 02:18
Thanks for the review. Yea, I am not sure why they make such a big deal about the Thermal effect of the TUF armor.
It seems like they could have easily saved a good bit of money not adding it to the motherboard. Additionally, I agree with ChrisH, that the "plastic divider" will act more as a thermal insulator, and drive component temps up. Luckily Sandy Bridge has a low thermal load.
The one thing that I do like about TUF armor, is that it might serve to protect the motherboard against small objects that could accidentally fall on it.

The in-depth review was greatly appreciated.
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# Under the TUF ArmorHank Tolman 2011-05-07 10:16
The heat from the components under the TUF armor will be extremely limited. Those components produce such a low amount of heat that any heat concern for them would actually be coming from the GPU or add-in components on regular boards without the shroud. So, in essence, the shroud also protects those components from the heat generated from add-in cards. Any components that do generate a significant enough amount of heat to be considered are covered by heatsinks; i.e. the MOSFETs.

As far as the Military Grade components, the reason they are limited to a few boards, I believe, is due to the cost inherent in using those components. ASUS still has to offer low-end motherboards and even higher-end motherboards at competitive prices. If they maintained all the features of those boards and used the higher grade components, the costs would be quite a bit higher.

Besides, even with the 25% better quality and longer life-span, nearly any motherboard made by the major manufacturers will long outlast it's usefulness to you.

-Hank
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# RE: ASUS Sabertooth P67 B3 TUF MotherboardTARIKK 2011-05-07 13:13
I really suspecting that Asus is asking from everyone to not to test the Thermal Armour, as I have read couple of reviws of this board and no one has tested the temps to see if it works or not.
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# RE: ASUS Sabertooth P67 B3 TUF Motherboardmoshpit 2011-05-07 20:35
I love the thermal shield. I have the older B2 revision since I'm only using the SATA3 ports, but I would really like to see the X79 version of this board come with the shield again.
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# RE: ASUS Sabertooth P67 B3 TUF Motherboardmoshpit 2011-05-07 20:37
Oh, by the way, I've seen SEVERAL tests using the shield, it slightly reduces temps on it's own. Add the 50mm in the slot provided and it temps drop WAY below other boards without the shield. I have a higher speed 50mm in mine and Asus Thermal Radar shows incredibly low temps across the board.
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# RE: ASUS Sabertooth P67 B3 TUF MotherboardOliver 2011-05-09 00:02
Great review! Thank you, Hank. I've bookmarked it for future overclock and benchmark reference.

However, before I can go playing with all the latest & greatest features, I am stuck with my Sabertooth's waking up from sleep problem. Which is a common problem among many users and there is an extensive discussion on the matter at vip asus forum. Even inconclusive, the current Sabertooth board has compatibility issue with many models of power supply. Thus after into sleep mode, the system can no longer wake up.

I just wonder that if you have the time and resources to try Sabertooth + i7-2600k with different PSUs to see if the bug exists on your board. FYI, I have 10 fans in total, 5 case fans, 2 cpu fans, 2 vga fans, and 1 assistant fan. If I move the power source of all five case fans and one cpu fan to a seperate power supply, the wakeup works, but not stable. If pc sleeps too long (few hours), it won't wakeup.
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# RE: RE: ASUS Sabertooth P67 B3 TUF MotherboardServando SIlva 2011-05-14 19:11
Are you Overclocking your CPU adding voltage or enabling LLC?
I've heard those options prevent system from recovering after sleep.
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# Sleep issueHank Tolman 2011-05-12 12:53
Oliver,

Unfortunately, I don't have the time or PSUs to try the different combinations. Also, I don't use the sleep function. Ever. So I haven't experienced this problem. That being said, I will certainly look into the issue and even try it out. If I find out anything that helps I will post back here.

Thanks!

Hank
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# RE: ASUS Sabertooth P67 B3 TUF MotherboardOliver 2011-05-15 11:40
Thank you anyway, Hank. I probably asked the question at the wrong place. Only because the problem is so intriguing that I have been addicted to it. Whoever is interested in the thread "Problems waking up from sleep mode" at #vip.asus.com/forum/topic.aspx?board_id=1&model=Sabertooth P67&SLanguage=en-us, is welcome to share your thoughts there.
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# The thermal armor is a good ideaArbie 2011-05-17 09:01
The thermal armor is actually a good idea - but it obviously should be used with an exhaust fan, not an intake fan! Then the shroud would channel relatively cool air from the board edges in over the low-power components, and dump that into the hotter air around the CPU and graphics board. That's probably how moshpit is using it (see earlier post here). Unfortunately, few people ever address this point so we see lots of remarks about how "the armor just makes things worse". C'mon guys... a little thought here would help.

It's too bad that Asus doesn't provide the needed fan and instructions. In another forum they indicated that they don't include the fan since they they can't warrant electromechanical stuff for as long as the mobo itself. But without the fan exhausting air, the armor makes no sense.

I also fault Asus support for not knowing or explaining how the armor is designed to be used. Blowing hot air down into it would clearly be ridiculous. I'm sure that whoever championed the armor idea back in the design groups is chagrined at how it has worked out when finally named, logo'd, stickered, sold, and supported.
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# nevervolker pittlik 2011-07-31 04:51
the biggest peace of # i've ever bought in my life,throw it away or try to find someone who's dump enough to buy it!!6 month without a driver who support a sli for gtx460 !!!!since last week !!!newest nvidia driver and surprise SLI is detected wooooh!!!try to enable it... APPCRASH!!!so for me there is no longer asus!!!!! i'll buy me a board who's working any board is better then ASUS SABERTOOTH P 67 for sure
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# RE: neverDavid Ramsey 2011-07-31 07:02
Or you could, you know, actually do a little research before you buy. Not all P67 motherboards support SLI...for example, the ASUS P8P67 and Sabertooth don't, but the P8P67 Pro does. Admittedly most manufacturers don't make this distinction as clearly as they should, but there's never going to be SLI support for your board.
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# RE: RE: neverBo 2011-09-26 04:17
Maybe I got this wrong but it looks to me as sabertooth supports SLI:
Multi-GPU Support: Supports NVIDIAŽ Quad-GPU SLI? Technology

##asus.com/Motherboards/Intel_Socket_1155/SABERTOOTH_P67/#specifications
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# RE: RE: neverGrep 2011-10-20 17:03
I got this board and I am running dual Evga 570GTx hd video cards in SLi and it works just fine, using bios revision 1606, its a P8P67 Sabertooth Rev 3.1
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# RE: ASUS Sabertooth P67 B3 TUF MotherboardGrep 2011-10-20 16:55
Running p867 rev 3.1 sabertooth and also running dual evga 570gtxhd video boards in sli mode and it works just fine.
on the Assist fan, its location is poor, it tends to block the top pci-e slot. Asus recomends a 50mmx50mmx10mm fan for this assist slot, a fan of that size is nearly useless, and is very noisy, if you get a 15mm thick fan or a 20mm thick fan it will be much better and quieter. the problem is this, the screws are two short for the 20mm fan, so you will need longer screws, Asus does not identify the thread pitch so you don't know what size screws to buy, The ability to control the assist fan speed is limited, and not mentioned in the manual at all.
The manual sucks big time, the pictures and line drawings are so small you can not even read it without a powerful magnafier. It leaves out critical info.The fan connector picture identify the pins with different anacronyms and does not explain what those mean. The 3 pin fan is id as gnd, 12v, and rotation, (define rotation), the 4 pin fan headers are id as gnd, cpu fan pwr, cpu fan in, cpu fan pwm, (define, fan pwr, and cpu fan in) well as I said the manual sucks.
There is a Green 20 pin connector thats supposed to provided for the front usb 3.0 ports, this cable is not provided, and I have no Idea where to get it, Asus doesn't seem to know. The Asus user forum is not monitored relying on mystified users to supply all help to users. Scan this forum to see a real review of this product. Severe Bios issues, Severe temp issues, Wake on lan issues, RMA issues. BBB has given Asus an F rating for failure to respond to complaints. I own one, I would not recommend this company or product. When the forum is filled with questions about overclocking, things are good, when its filled by complaints of RMA and feature that don't work, things are bad, don't accept my word for it, read the forums for yourself
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