Archive Home arrow Reviews: arrow Video Cards arrow VisionTek Killer HD5770 Combo Card
VisionTek Killer HD5770 Combo Card E-mail
Reviews - Featured Reviews: Video Cards
Written by Steven Iglesias-Hearst   
Tuesday, 15 February 2011
Table of Contents: Page Index
VisionTek Killer HD5770 Combo Card
Closer Look: VisionTek Killer Combo
VisionTek Killer HD5770 Detailed Features
Features and Specifications
Killer NIC Software and Testing
Video Card Testing Methodology
DX10: 3DMark Vantage
DX10: Street Fighter IV
DX11: Aliens vs Predator
DX11: Battlefield Bad Company 2
DX11: BattleForge
DX11: Lost Planet 2
DX11: Tom Clancy's HAWX 2
DX11: Metro 2033
DX11: Unigine Heaven 2.1
VisionTek Killer HD5770 Temperatures
VGA Power Consumption
VisionTek Killer HD5770 Overclocking
Final Thoughts and Conclusion

VisionTek Killer HD5770 Detailed Features

In this section we shall take an in depth look a the Killer HD5770 and see what is going on beneath the shroud of mystery.

VisionTek_Killer_HD5770_Combo_Card_Cooler.jpg

The fan is a model GA9202H 90mm fan made by a Taiwanese company called Apistek who design and manufacture high quality heatsinks solutions for GPU and CPU applications, so it might well be safe to say that the heatsink was made by Apistek too. Neither VisionTek nor Apistek have any specs on the fan, it is a simple two wire design and the speed is controlled by voltage rather than PWM. The design looks simple but effective, using a mixture of solid surface area and extended fins to actively cool the GPU and allow air to get to the other on board components.

VisionTek_Killer_HD5770_Combo_Card_PCI_Bracket.jpg

On the PCI bracket we have an HDMI port (with audio), two dual link DVI-I ports and a CAT5 LAN port. The top part is also vented but I don't think much air will be exhausting here due to the design of the cooler but the more ventilation the better, right?

In the image below I have zoomed in on what I consider to be the highlights of this card. On the right we have the all important 40nm Juniper GPU driving the Killer HD5770 with its 800 unified shaders and core clock at the reference speed of 850MHz. Next to that we see that VisionTek have opted for Elpida GDDR5 RAM module's over the usual Samsung chips that we normally see, there are eight units in total (four front, four back) for a total 1GB of memory running at 1200MHz (4.8GHz effective) and these Elpida chips are rated at 5GHz so there is a little bit of headroom for overclocking.

VisionTek_Killer_HD5770_Combo_Card_Chips.jpg

On the left hand side we have the E2100 network processing unit which runs at 400MHz and utilizes two Elixir 64MB DDR2 modules for a total of 128MB RAM running at 266MHz. The Killer HD5770 also has its own PLX bridge chip on board, and I can only assume its purpose to be for bandwidth management. The PLX PEX8624-BB50BC F is a 24 lane, 6 port PCI Express Gen 2 (5.0 GT/s) switch and should provide all the bandwidth this card may need since it is using more than the 16 PCI-E lanes provided by the PCI-E slot.

VisionTek_Killer_HD5770_Combo_Card_MARVELL_88E1118R-NNC2.jpg

Supporting the Killer E2100 NPU (on the reverse side of the card) is the Marvell Alaska 88E1118R 10/100/1000BASE-T PHY with RGMII which is a Ethernet Physical transceiver (Ethernet PHYceiver) Its purpose is physical, analogue signal access to the link which in this case is the E2100 NPU thus completing the NIC (Network Integrated Controller) portion of the card.

VisionTek_Killer_HD5770_Combo_Card_uP6204BJ_Voltage_Controller.jpg

The VisionTek Killer HD5770 utilizes a 3-Phase uP6204BJ voltage controller, there is no software or BIOS level voltage control, when the card is idle it uses 0.95v and uses 1.2v at full load.

VisionTek_Killer_HD5770_Combo_Card_uP7706U8_Memory_Voltage_controller.jpg

The last chip to point out is the uP7706U8 memory voltage controller which is fairly standard on Radeon HD5XXX and HD6XXX video cards.



 

Comments 

 
# I like the ideaktew 2011-02-16 07:19
I've had very good history with 5770s and the network speed improvements are very interesting (if you need that type of thing). I think my core disappointment is they did not use a quality cooling solution. Better heatsink or double fan or something to get to or below reference standards.

If I put a mid range machine together again, I'm looking for cool and quiet just as much as performance. This one seems to miss on each of those details and the price has moved it beyond a range I'd be considering in a mid-range build.
Report Comment
 
 
# HmmIM0001 2011-02-16 10:55
The 5770 is a nice midrange card and paired with the Killer Nic, it would be the perfect card for IMO, a WoW player who wants a little graphics upgrade (or a lot) and a nice nic boost to boot. (It is one of the big games that does show a benefit using the Killer Nic vs Onboard.

A lot of people continue to cry foul and say it is just a placebo effect, but a lot of the high end gamers still pick one up since it does do a bit of cleaning and prioritizing of gaming traffic over other traffic while you are gaming. I do have a new Killer 2100 at home here to try but I have yet to have the time to open my rig and install it. Just too busy to deal with it as the comp also needs a bit of tweaking while I have her out.

Either way this card would be a prime candidate for a good crossfire setup to make it a potent little combo.

Also the cooling solution is similar to what VisionTek has been using on a lot of their card and it may make the system itself run a bit hotter since it vents into the case, it also cools the card a reasonable bit better than the stock reference design while also being quieter. What is the bummer is the 5700 series chip runs hotter than the 5800 series for whatever reason. It is the same chip used on the 5870M on laptops and they just get hot under load. The VT 5870 I own on my desktop has a very similar cooler (but more copper) but it idles at around 30-40C and under load never goes above the 70C's. A nice improvement over the older awesome yet super hot running 4800 series. (I had a VT 4870X2) It idled at 58C if the idle clocks were enabled, and under load it often hit 80+ with the VRM's themselves hitting 100C quite often on a lot of owners cards. They ran hot but ran great while they lasted.
Report Comment
 
 
# Not that cheap, IMO.Olle P 2011-02-17 04:11
While the VisionTek Killer 2100 is a pretty expensive NIC, you can get a similar card at
Report Comment
 
 
# most of the reply disappeared...Olle P 2011-02-17 04:14
A similar NIC can be had at
Report Comment
 
 
# Darn code!Olle P 2011-02-17 04:18
It's the "less than" sign that cut my messages short... Here we go again:

A similar NIC can be had at less than $10.
A basic HD5770 less than $130.
Combined less than $140, which is way less than the $200 combo card.

The combo card is just about only worthwhile when you have a micro-ITX motherboard (only one expansion slot) *and* need the extra network speed *and* need fair graphics performance.
Report Comment
 
 
# RE: VisionTek Killer HD5770 Combo CardSteven Iglesias-Hearst 2011-02-18 00:32
Similar NIC? or are you talking about any old network card?
Value rating was based on buying a VisionTek HD5770 and a Killer NIC since there are no other VGA+NIC comparison products.

AS I pointed out in my article, this card is aimed at MMORPG / RTS players.
Report Comment
 
 
# RE: RE: VisionTek Killer HD5770 Combo CardOlle P 2011-02-18 05:20
The only reasons for using a NIC when there is a network controller on the motherboard are to a) offload the CPU and/or b) to have more network connectors.
"Any old network card", as you put it, *will* do this. And when it comes to MMORPG gaming the LAN speed is fairly irrelevant, since the server typically doesn't reside within the player's LAN. The vast majority of players have 100 Mbps internet speed or less, which will bottleneck any NIC.
So for relevancy the comparison should also include a cheap, separate, network card, and it should be made towards some server on the internet, or at least on a 100Mbps LAN incapable of higher speeds. I have a hunch that the Killer card isn't decidedly faster in that situation...
Report Comment
 
 
# RE: RE: RE: VisionTek Killer HD5770 Combo CardSteven Iglesias-Hearst 2011-02-18 14:49
I do not own a game server that I can test on, also I can't just choose 'some' game server to conduct tests on because there are too many variables involved for it to be a controlled test. If the test isn't controlled then the results might as well just be plucked from a hat.

All I wanted to find out was whether UDP transmission was faster on the Killer NIC than on my on-board NIC since game traffic relies on UDP protocol. Testing this on a LAN resricted to 100Mb/s won't prove asnything as it is still a LAN.
Report Comment
 
 
# RE: RE: RE: RE: VisionTek Killer HD5770 Combo CardOlle P 2011-02-21 04:03
"Testing this on a LAN resricted to 100Mb/s won't prove asnything as it is still a LAN."
It will prove what happens when the top speed is governed by an external bottleneck. Restricting the speed to 10Mbps should be even more realistic, since that's closer to the real world limits.
Your own test showed that the motherboard's NIC ran both TCP and UDP at about 95 Mbps, which is what you get with a 100Mb restriction.
Report Comment
 
 
# RE: RE: RE: RE: RE: VisionTek Killer HD5770 Combo CardSteven Iglesias-Hearst 2011-02-21 04:40
"It will prove what happens when the top speed is governed by an external bottleneck. Restricting the speed to 10Mbps should be even more realistic, since that's closer to the real world limits."

Since both NIC's are capable of near 100Mbps on TCP and UDP then the results would be equal and inconclusive.

The only real way to test would be to set up a game server and control the load on that server, connect to it with two identical machines at the same time (one with killer NIC one without) and record average frame rates and ping and also run the same test as detailed within this article.

My budget won't allow for that, so I test within my means.
Report Comment
 
 
# usefulldie 2011-03-26 03:14
6870 I like it for price and power consumption I think for best buy
Report Comment
 

Comments have been disabled by the administrator.

Search Benchmark Reviews
QNAP Network Storage Servers

Follow Benchmark Reviews on FacebookReceive Tweets from Benchmark Reviews on Twitter