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Written by Olin Coles   
Tuesday, 01 February 2011
Table of Contents: Page Index
Mushkin Callisto Deluxe Solid State Drive
Features and Specifications
Closer Look: Mushkin Callisto Deluxe
SandForce SF-1200 SSD Controller
SSD Testing Methodology
AS-SSD Benchmark
ATTO Disk Benchmark
CrystalDiskMark 3.0 Tests
Iometer IOPS Performance
EVEREST Disk Benchmark
HDD vs Hybrid Drive vs SSD
Mushkin Callisto Deluxe Conclusion

SandForce SF-1200 SSD Controller

The SandForce SF-1200 SATA-3GBps controller is new to the industry, but many manufacturers are already hailing it as the replacement for Indilinx's industry-leading Barefoot processor. Both are second-generation SATA products limited to 3.0 GB/s transfer speeds, and both offer similar specifications. SandForce adds DuraClass technology to their SF-1200 processor, which claims to provide best-in-class endurance, performance, and lower power consumption. DuraWrite technology extends the endurance of MLC-NAND memory by providing at least five year lifecycles measured with 3000-5000 cycle MLC flash. Additionally, SandForce RAISE technology provides RAID-like protection for single SSD computer systems, and data is secured with AES-128 automatic encryption.

SandForce hit the 2010 SSD industry with full force, much the same way that Indilinx did back in 2009, and now controls retail consumer market share. Finished-goods companies can utilize the SandForce SF1200 processor in their own product line, which then receives a "SandForce Driven" badge. The SandForce SF-1222 processor is presently utilized in at least two-dozen products on the solid state drive market.

SandForce_SF-1200_SSD_Processor_Top.jpg

From the view above the printed circuit board (PCB), it doesn't look like there's anything dramatically innovative on the SandForce Solid State Drive. Eight flash NAND modules make a horseshoe around the SandForce SF-1200 SSD processor, and plenty of electronics fill in the remaining space atop the printed circuit board. But once the SandForce SSD board is turned to expose the underside, the difference is obvious: SandForce has used their DuraClass technology to remove the DRAM buffer.

SandForce_SF-1200_SSD_Processor_Bottom.jpg

The 2nd-generation SATA-3.0GBps SandForce SF-1222TA3-SBH processor is part of their SF-1200 family of SSD controller chips, and SSDs will utilize either the SF-1200 processor for retail consumers or SF-1500 for enterprise devices. All SandForce SSD controllers offer native TRIM support in Microsoft Windows-7, Native Command Queuing (NCQ) with 32 command slots, and Self-Monitoring, Analysis, and Reporting Technology (SMART) command set. While not directly important to transfer speeds or operational performance, SandForce utilizes a Tensilica Diamond Core DC-570T CPU inside the SF-1200 processor.

SandForce_SF-1222TA3-SBH_Processor.jpg

Another benefit of SandForce's SF-1200 architecture is that the SSD keeps all information on the NAND grid and removes the need for a separate cache buffer DRAM module. The result is a faster transaction, albeit at the expense of total storage capacity. SandForce SSDs utilize over-provisioning technology, which allocates a portion of NAND for data storage and the remainder reserved for transaction and cache buffer space. SandForce has also marketing custom firmware to the finished-goods companies that sell their SSDs, which remove performance restrictions.

The SF-1200 SSD processor provides ECC data protection and includes SandForce's unique RAISE (Redundant Array of Independent Silicon Elements) technology. RAISE provides the protection and reliability of RAID on a single SSD drive, thanks to flash architecture, without the significant write overhead of parity. The SandForce DuraClass technology automatically stores data in AES-128 encrypted format, preventing data extraction directly from the physical flash memory modules.

Micron-Intel_DRAM_29F64G08CAMDB.jpg

Sixteen multi-layer cell Intel 29F64G08CAMDB flash NAND modules are joined to the SandForce SF-1200 controller. On professional-level 28% over-provisioned SandForce SSDs, these NAND modules may combine for 128GB of physical storage space yet only 100GB of this capacity is designated for data. Consumer-level SandForce SSDs receive 7% over-provisioning and 128GB devices will yield 120GB of usable storage space.

Because the SandForce SF-1200 SSD processor inside many SSDs is a non-exclusive component available market-wide, Benchmark Reviews expects to see many new solid state storage products using this controller in the near future. Please continue on for details and performance results for this Solid State Drive...



 

Comments 

 
# RE: Muskin Callisto Deluxe Solid State DriveRobert17 2011-02-01 23:37
Well thanks again Olin. Nice review. The more SSDs you test, the more crowded the competition becomes to the advantage of the end user. All is well in the SSD-verse. (PS, forgot the site, but I did see a "sale" item on an SSD, 64Gb @ $84 last week. $$ Looking better all the time.)
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# Waiting,.......RealNeil 2011-02-02 07:06
Good look at SSD's. Thanks for your time and effort putting this all together Olin. I'll refer back to this info when I'm ready to buy more of these drives. I'm still waiting for SSD Prices to come down a little more. I only have one of them, an OCZ Agility-2 that is seriously fast, but I can't afford to put one in the other computers yet.

Maybe SSD makers could learn a lesson from Amazon, whereby they lowered the prices of their Kindle Readers and then had the very best sales and profits that they have ever recorded in the last quarter of 2010.
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# Garbage collection (of words)Ron 2011-02-02 16:58
I would re-check your facts about GC being as bad as defragging aN SSD drive. Yes, it will add some extra wear, but this would be nothing on the order of a full defrag. When these drives are used in a situation where TRIM is not available, then GC is the only solution available. I am very wary of their speeds when in a "dirty" state, and how a normal home desktop user would really be affected. I think cheap Slow long lasting SSD would be great(direct competitor to hard drive) simply for the Noise, power and space requirements. £/GB equality.
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