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Written by Steven Iglesias-Hearst   
Thursday, 13 January 2011
Table of Contents: Page Index
Thermaltake eSports MEKA G1 Keyboard
Closer Look: Thermaltake MEKA G1
Thermaltake MEKA G1 Detailed Features
Testing and Results
Final Thoughts
Conclusion

Thermaltake MEKA G1 Conclusion

In this section I am going to write a brief five point summary on the following categories; Performance, Appearance, Construction, Functionality and Value. These views are my own and help me to give the Thermaltake MEKA G1 Mechanical Gaming Keyboard a rating out of 10. A high or low score does not necessarily mean that it is better or worse than a similar gaming keyboard that has been reviewed by another writer here at Benchmark Reviews, which may have got a higher or lower score. It is however a good indicator of whether the keyboard is good or not. I would strongly urge you to read the entire review, if you have not already, so that you can make an educated decision for yourself.

I was sceptical of any performance advantage that might be gained from using a mechanical keyboard before I had used one, it is one of those devices that have been long forgotten like the beige box of their era. Once you have had the pleasure of using one you will not want to go back to your regular keyboard, so I encourage you to give one a try, if you have access to one that is. With regards to gaming though, I cannot really say if I have noticed any benefit offered from the mechanical nature, this will only become obvious months or years down the line if I am still using this keyboard or not. I have got through many regular keyboards that have simply broken due to their cheap nature. Since I only play FPS I won't notice the anti-ghosting or increased actions per minute afforded by the MEKA G1 but I really appreciate the tactile and audible feedback.

The appearance of the Tt eSports MEKA G1 is going to get mixed ratings, due to the graphical nature of this review you can easily make up your own mind. The MEKA G1 is right up my street, I really appreciate the minimalistic looks and the color scheme suits my needs down to the ground. Sometime less really is more.

The MEKA G1 weighs in at just over 3lbs, and while I haven't wielded it as a weapon or used it like a dance mat I can safely say that it is one tough cookie that is sure to last for some time to come. The retractable height adjusting feet are hopefully as tough as the keyboard itself although I don't think I will use them as the keyboard is nicely angled anyway. The ABS plastic exterior shell and metal inner chassis give the MEKA G1 a feeling of real strength and gives me confidence that I won't hurt it with some heavy use.

Functionality is good with the MEKA G1, the media keys are a nice addition and the replacement of the left windows key is like a blessing for an FPS gamer such as myself. While I have not noticed the benefit of anti-ghosting I can rest assured that it is there and of course I had to make sure it worked, and it does! When you connect the MEKA G1 to your PC with the USB to PS/2 adapter you really can hold down all the keys on the keyboard without getting that annoying tone and having all the keys register, but I am not sure why you would want to. If you connect via USB the anti-ghosting works for just six keys only, this is more than enough for my needs and will work just fine.

As of March 2011, the MEKA G1 will set you back $119 at Amazon. This is a lot for a gaming keyboard, but let's not forget that the MEKA G1 is a mechanical keyboard at heart and will likely outlast most if not all of your current system. The gaming related features of the MEKA G1 are anti-ghosting, quick response keys and the omission of the windows key on the left of the space bar. It hasn't made a great deal of difference to my game but I only play FPS, and it is also a damn good keyboard to type on. The MEKA G1 is competing for your cash with the SteelSeries 7G, it has all the same features and is slightly more compact, it takes up less real estate and undercuts it by $10. The real difference will be your personal preference on looks.

The MEKA G1 is a very good keyboard and I wouldn't hesitate to recommend it to anyone, not just for gaming but for everyday use as it will last as long as the paint on the keys and will still keep going afterwards, whereas your standard rubber dome keyboard will have curled up and died and met its maker a long long time before.

Pros:Benchmark Reviews Golden Tachometer Award

+ Cherry Black MX mechanical switches
+ Tactile and audible feedback
+ Detachable palm rest
+ Two USB 2.0 ports
+ Minimal looks is just right
+ Heavyweight build quality
+ Superior anti-ghosting ability
+ Media function key replaces windows key FTW

Cons:

- Lock status LED's are way too bright
- Full anti-ghosting only works with USB to PS/2 adapter

Ratings:

  • Performance: 9.00
  • Appearance: 9.00
  • Construction: 9.50
  • Functionality: 9.00
  • Value: 8.50

Final Score: 9.0 out of 10.

Excellence Achievement: Benchmark Reviews Golden Tachometer Award.

Questions? Comments? Benchmark Reviews really wants your feedback. We invite you to leave your remarks in our Discussion Forum.


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Comments 

 
# SuggestionCharles 2011-01-13 19:29
For keyboard tests you should use Aqua's Keytest to see if NKRO is functioning properly.
#geekhack.org/showthread.php?t=6643

You should also do testing on the USB HUB, it has been suggested that the USB Hub on the MEKA G1 is just a USB 1.1 controller.
For a USB 2.0 HUB you should see sequential reads & writes between 28 & 30 Megabytes per second.
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# Steelseries 6GV2Poldo 2011-01-13 19:43
It looks like a Steelseries 6Gv2
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# its a 7g not a 6gv2zanz 2011-01-13 22:34
its a 7g not a 6gv2, the 7g has usb, audio extenders and a palm rest, the 6gv2 is just a keyboard with no rest usb or audio
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# 6Gv2Poldo 2011-01-16 04:28
Sorry, I meant the key layout. ;)
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# hmmmmmmmfafkac 2011-01-13 22:58
for record, USB is not capable of full anti-ghost and nkro, cherry black MX switches are silent and no tactile
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# Have you read the article?Steven Iglesias-Hearst 2011-01-14 00:31
@ Charles: I will test with Aqua Keytest when I get a moment and post back. There is no need to test the bandwith of the USB ports as they only support 100mA max anyway.
@Poldo: I mentioned this in my article...
@fafack: I read the complete data sheets on Cherry MX switches, I have also read several articles talking about the difference between the colors. It appears you read the pros and cons and ignored the article.
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# hmmmfafkac 2011-01-14 00:44
i have steelseries 6G V2 so i know how cherry MX blacks feel, and i would never switch to membrane keyboard if i can help it
it should be scribed as no tactile and silent, its true that i didnt read whole article
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# RE: hmmmSteven Iglesias-Hearst 2011-01-14 06:35
I also have the 6Gv2, and I have tested the 7G also. I explained in my testing results how I felt about the Cherry Black MX keys, please take a read to see if you agree.
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# RE: Have you read the article?Charles 2011-01-14 06:41
Testing the bandwidth of the USB port is actually should be done; a USB 2.0 Flash Drive like those from Patriot, Crucial, SanDisk and other manufacturers high end lines can easily reach the upper limit of 25MB/s of the port.
If the port is actually a USB 1.1 Hub then those devices will be limited to less than half that speed (around 12MB/s)
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# CharlesSteven Iglesias-Hearst 2011-01-14 08:51
I tested with Aqua's keytest and NKRO works fine.

I also tested the USB ports using the AIDA 64 disk benchmark and I have uploaded an image to my photobucket.
#i945.photobucket.com/albums/ad297/hatchet_2009/AIDA64_R.png

Looks like the ports are USB 2.0
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# RE: CharlesCharles 2011-01-16 04:38
Thanks, I'm glad you did both tests as it makes suggesting this keyboard (and thus linking to this review) easier.
Many keyboards offer "USB 2.0" hubs and they are actually just 1.1 bridge ports or hubs which can cause some terribly slow speeds on modern flash drives.

As for the Ghosting & NKRO testing, a limited number of mechanical boards saying they have NKRO have actually been wrong about that.

If at all possible, could you show a screen-shot of the keyboard using AKT, under USB (even if you have NKRO) the max you'll get is 6 normal keys with 4 Modifiers being active at once.
Modifiers are CTRL, ALT, Shift, & Tab.

Still, showing that the board can hit any random 6 keys at once without a problem is more than enough as most keyboards experience blocking at 2 keys even because they use the very old IBM Key Matrix. Though even for gamers, most of the time you won't need more than 6KRO.

Though I do know I specifically use around 7-8 keys at a time during some games; it's only a few titles (Simulation & Rhythm games.)
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# RE: Thermaltake eSports MEKA G1 KeyboardSteven Iglesias-Hearst 2011-01-16 11:56
NKRO when connected via USB is six keys max.

NKRO when connected via USB with all modifiers active (CTRL, ALT, Shift and Tab) is four keys max.

Hope this is helpful enough without a screenshot, print screen won't register due to the NKRO limitation while I am holding the other keys down.
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# RE: RE: Thermaltake eSports MEKA G1 KeyboardOlin Coles 2011-01-16 12:08
Thank you for fulfilling all of the extra requests, and going beyond the norm for your review.
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# RE: Thermaltake eSports MEKA G1 KeyboardDarkdriver 2011-02-06 05:50
It would be great if you could make a comparison between the MEKA G1 and the Zowie Celeritas (for gaming needs). I have to decide between those two keyboards, since I don't know which switch type to take. Unfortunately there is no possibility to test a mechanical keyboard in a shop here.
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# RE: RE: Thermaltake eSports MEKA G1 KeyboardSteven Iglesias-Hearst 2011-02-06 11:14
As you say the main difference seems to be the switch type... I have a couple of guides you could take a look at that could help you to make up your mind.

##overclock.net/keyboards/491752-mechanical-keyboard-guide.html

#hothardware.com/cs/blogs/mrtg/archive/2009/03/09/mechanical-key-switch-keyboards-demystified.aspx
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# RE: Thermaltake eSports MEKA G1 Keyboardeclipse 2011-12-21 03:03
"Cons:

- Full anti-ghosting only works with USB to PS/2 adapter "

THATS NOT A CON OF THE KEYBOARD THATS BECAUSE OF THE USB PROTOCOL
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# RE: RE: Thermaltake eSports MEKA G1 KeyboardSteven Iglesias-Hearst 2011-12-21 13:10
It wouldn't be a con if the MEKA G1 were fitted with a PS/2 connector as standard, with an optional PS/2 to USB adapter.
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