Archive Home arrow Reviews: arrow Processors arrow Intel Core i5-2500K Sandy Bridge CPU
Intel Core i5-2500K Sandy Bridge CPU E-mail
Reviews - Featured Reviews: Processors
Written by Hank Tolman   
Sunday, 02 January 2011
Table of Contents: Page Index
Intel Core i5-2500K Sandy Bridge CPU
Features and Specifications
Closer Look: Core i5-2500K
CPU Testing and Results
AIDA64 Benchmark Tests
Passmark PerformanceTest
PCMark Vantage Benchmark Tests
SiSoftware Sandra Tests
Cinebench R11.5 Benchmarks
Street Fighter IV Benchmark
x264Bench HD 3.0 Test
Sandy Bridge Final Thoughts
Intel Core i5-2500K Conclusion

PCMark Vantage Benchmark Tests

PCMark Vantage is an objective hardware performance benchmark tool for PCs running 32- and 64-bit versions of Microsoft Windows Vista or Windows 7. PCMark Vantage is well suited for benchmarking any type of Microsoft Windows Vista/7 PC: from multimedia home entertainment systems and laptops, to dedicated workstations and high-end gaming rigs. Benchmark Reviews has decided to use a few select tests from the suite to demonstrate simulated real-world processor usage in this article. Our tests were conducted on 64-bit Windows 7, with results displayed in the chart below.

TV and Movies Suite

  • TV and Movies 1 (CPU=50%, RAM=2%, GPU=45%, SSD=3%)
    • Two simultaneous threads
    • Video transcoding: HD DVD to media server archive
    • Video playback: HD DVD w/ additional lower bitrate HD content from HDD, as downloaded from net
  • TV and Movies 2 (CPU=50%, RAM=2%, GPU=45%, SSD=3%)
    • Two simultaneous threads
    • Video transcoding: HD DVD to media server archive
    • Video playback, HD MPEG-2: 19.39 Mbps terrestrial HDTV playback
  • TV and Movies 3 (SSD=100%)
    • HDD Media Center
  • TV and Movies 4 (CPU=50%, RAM=2%, GPU=45%, SSD=3%)
    • Video transcoding: media server archive to portable device
    • Video playback, HD MPEG-2: 48 Mbps Blu-ray playback

Gaming Suite*

  • Gaming 1 (CPU=30%, GPU=70%)
    • GPU game test
  • Gaming 2 (SSD=100%)
    • HDD: game HDD
  • Gaming 3 (CPU=75%, RAM=5%, SSD=20%)
    • Two simultaneous threads
    • CPU game test
    • Data decompression: level loading
  • Gaming 4 (CPU=42%, RAM=1%, GPU=24%, SSD=33%)
    • Three simultaneous threads
    • GPU game test
    • CPU game test
    • HDD: game HDD

Music Suite

  • Music 1 (CPU=50%, RAM=3%, GPU=13%, SSD=34%)
    • Three simultaneous threads
    • Web page rendering - w/ music shop content
    • Audio transcoding: WAV -> WMA lossless
    • HDD: Adding music to Windows Media Player
  • Music 2 (CPU=100%)
    • Audio transcoding: WAV -> WMA lossless
  • Music 3 (CPU=100%)
    • Audio transcoding: MP3 -> WMA
  • Music 4 (CPU=50%, SSD=50%)
    • Two simultaneous threads
    • Audio transcoding: WMA -> WMA
    • HDD: Adding music to Windows Media Player

* EDITOR'S NOTE: Hopefully our readers will carefully consider how relative PCMark Vantage is as "real-world" benchmark, since many of the tests rely on unrelated hardware components. For example, per the FutureMark PCMark Vantage White Paper document, Gaming test #2 weighs the storage device for 100% of the test score. In fact, according to PCMark Vantage the video card only impacts 23% of the total gaming score, but the CPU represents 37% of the final score. As our tests in this article (and many others) has already proven, gaming performance has a lot more to do with the GPU than the CPU, and especially more than the hard drive or SSD (which is worth 38% of the final gaming performance score).

Intel_i5-2500K_PCMark.png

The PCMark Vantage test are all over the place. This is likely due to the fact that much of the testing relies on components other than the CPU. While we kept the test systems as similar as possible, because of the different hardware required, it wasn't possible to only change the CPU. Interestingly enough, the Core i5-2500K outperformed the i7-920 by a consistent margin of about 3.5% in the TV and Movies suite, the Gaming suite, and in the overall PCMark score. In the music tests, it fails to overcome the i7-920.

The same is not true with performance in comparison to the Phenom-II X4-975BE. The Core i5-920 marks gains of between 8.5% and almost 38%. The scores vary widely between AMD CPUs. Remember to consider the editor's note from the beginning of the PCMark Vantage tests carefully.



 

Comments 

 
# GamerKyle 2011-01-06 20:39
I agree with the that every new line of processors comes with new motherboards. To me this is quite silly and I wish that they would not do as such. It is also a fault when Intel is placing quite the restriction on overclocking even with the K models.

Either way I am most likely going to get the i5 2500k since it is very strong. Also the price is rather cheap at $211 when currently the i5 750 is $200 and the i5 760 is about $209 dollars. Since I did not upgrade following the first i series I would need to get a new motherboard anyway.Integrated graphics means little to me since as a gamer I would get a higher end GPU regardless. I just have to make sure the motherboard is p67 not H67 for overclocking and such.

Anyway nice read, thanks for the article.
Report Comment
 
 
# MrJMG 2011-02-23 14:57
If the p67 motherboards do not use the GPU on these new chips does that mean the GPU potential goes to waste I.e. If it were to make use of it, then in a standard system would you have, in effect, two graphics cards (with the intel HD GPU plus whatever other dedicated graphics card you use working together)?
Report Comment
 
 
# RE: MrOlin Coles 2011-02-23 15:12
Only H67-Express motherboards can utilize Sandy Bridge integrated graphics, because only those motherboards have the DVI/D-SUB/HDMI output ports built-in. NVIDIA is already working with Intel on this very solution. Using Optimus technology, paired with Lucid Logic 'GPU Virtualization' software (yet unannounced), the Sandy Bridge CPU will be able to enable QuickSync + GPU.
Report Comment
 
 
# mrzikkun 2012-03-24 11:35
nahh. actually h61 also have dvi, hdmi ports, dont know about d-sub(need it?). so actually use h61 and run this cpu is could be cheap, than buy a h67 or whatever that expensive twice
Report Comment
 

Comments have been disabled by the administrator.

Search Benchmark Reviews
QNAP Network Storage Servers

Follow Benchmark Reviews on FacebookReceive Tweets from Benchmark Reviews on Twitter