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Intel Core i5-2500K Sandy Bridge CPU E-mail
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Written by Hank Tolman   
Sunday, 02 January 2011
Table of Contents: Page Index
Intel Core i5-2500K Sandy Bridge CPU
Features and Specifications
Closer Look: Core i5-2500K
CPU Testing and Results
AIDA64 Benchmark Tests
Passmark PerformanceTest
PCMark Vantage Benchmark Tests
SiSoftware Sandra Tests
Cinebench R11.5 Benchmarks
Street Fighter IV Benchmark
x264Bench HD 3.0 Test
Sandy Bridge Final Thoughts
Intel Core i5-2500K Conclusion

Video Transcoding Tests

x264 HD Benchmark 3.19 Test

Tech ARP's x264 HD Benchmark comprises the Avisynth video scripting engine, an x264 encoder, a sample 720P video file, and a script file that actually runs the benchmark. The script invokes four two-pass encoding runs and reports the average frames per second encoded as a result. The script file is a simple batch file, so you could edit the encoding parameters if you were interested, although your results wouldn't then be comparable to others.

Intel_i5-2500K_x264.png

Since the Sandy Bridge CPUs are meant to be more media minded, video transcoding tests should give us a good idea of just how much they have improved. In the AVI format transcode, the Core i5-2500K outperforms the similarly priced Phenom-II X4-975BE by about 16.5%.

The MP4 test shows a similar story to the AVI test, but with slightly more impressive gains. The Core i5-2500K performs 28% better than the Phenom-II X4-975BE. With the huge expansion of the smart phone market, a lot of people are ripping their DVDs or other videos to MP4 format. Also, digital storage of movies and videos is becoming more common than ever. With this in mind, the CPUs that can handle this process the fastest will have a large market, probably even larger than the Gaming CPU market. I think Intel is counting on it.

Handbrake 0.9.4 Video Transcoder

HandBrake is an open-source, GPL-licensed, multiplatform, multithreaded video transcoder program designed to convert MPEG video (including DVD-Video) into an MPEG-4 video file in MPEG-4 Part 14 (.mp4) or Matroska (.mkv) containers. The program is used to convert DVDs into other forms so they can be viewed on portable media devices and with most media players. While Handbrake was originally developed for BeOS, it is now available for Linux, Microsoft Windows and Mac OS X.

Handbrake is a readily available program that easily handles and utilizes multiple CPU cores and threads. This makes it an ideal program for us to use to test CPU performance. The amount of time it takes for Handbrake to convert a media file scales very nicely based on the clock speed and available cores of the CPU. For this test, I used a 4.34GB video file in MPEG format to be converted to MP4 format using the "iPhone & iPod Touch" presets. I recorded the total time in (min:sec) that it took to transcode the video file.

Intel_i5-2500K_Handbrake.png

The Handbrake video transcode test shows us the same result that we got from the x264 test. When transcoding video from one format to another, the Core i5-2500K has the definite advantage. We transcoded a home video file that was just over 2 hours long into a format that fits on an smartphone or mp4 player. The Core i5-2500K completed this almost 3.5 minutes faster than the Phenom-II X4-975BE and over a minute faster than the Core i7-920.



 

Comments 

 
# GamerKyle 2011-01-06 20:39
I agree with the that every new line of processors comes with new motherboards. To me this is quite silly and I wish that they would not do as such. It is also a fault when Intel is placing quite the restriction on overclocking even with the K models.

Either way I am most likely going to get the i5 2500k since it is very strong. Also the price is rather cheap at $211 when currently the i5 750 is $200 and the i5 760 is about $209 dollars. Since I did not upgrade following the first i series I would need to get a new motherboard anyway.Integrated graphics means little to me since as a gamer I would get a higher end GPU regardless. I just have to make sure the motherboard is p67 not H67 for overclocking and such.

Anyway nice read, thanks for the article.
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# MrJMG 2011-02-23 14:57
If the p67 motherboards do not use the GPU on these new chips does that mean the GPU potential goes to waste I.e. If it were to make use of it, then in a standard system would you have, in effect, two graphics cards (with the intel HD GPU plus whatever other dedicated graphics card you use working together)?
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# RE: MrOlin Coles 2011-02-23 15:12
Only H67-Express motherboards can utilize Sandy Bridge integrated graphics, because only those motherboards have the DVI/D-SUB/HDMI output ports built-in. NVIDIA is already working with Intel on this very solution. Using Optimus technology, paired with Lucid Logic 'GPU Virtualization' software (yet unannounced), the Sandy Bridge CPU will be able to enable QuickSync + GPU.
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# mrzikkun 2012-03-24 11:35
nahh. actually h61 also have dvi, hdmi ports, dont know about d-sub(need it?). so actually use h61 and run this cpu is could be cheap, than buy a h67 or whatever that expensive twice
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