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Written by Hank Tolman   
Monday, 03 January 2011
Table of Contents: Page Index
AMD Phenom-II X4-975 BE CPU HDZ975FBGMBOX
Features and Specifications
Closer Look: Phenom-II X4-975BE
Testing and Results
AIDA64 Extreme Edition v1.1 Benchmark Tests
Passmark PerformanceTest
PCMark Vantage Benchmark Tests
SiSoftware Sandra
Cinebench R11.5 Benchmarks
Street Fighter IV Benchmark
Video Transcoding Tests
AMD Phenom-II X4-975BE Final Thoughts
AMD Phenom-II X4-975 BE Conclusion

AIDA64 Extreme Edition v1.1 Benchmark Tests

In November, 2010, FinalWire acquired and discontinued Lavalys EVEREST, updated it, and released it as AIDA64. AIDA64 is an industry leading system diagnostics and benchmarking solution for enthusiasts PC users, based on the award-winning EVEREST Technology. During system optimizations and tweaking it provides essential system and overclock information, advanced hardware monitoring and diagnostics capabilities to check the effects of the applied settings. CPU, FPU and memory benchmarks are available to measure the actual system performance and compare it to previous states or other systems. Furthermore, complete software, operating system and security information makes AIDA64 a comprehensive system diagnostics tool that offers a total of 100 pages of information about your PC.

All of the benchmarks used in our test bed rely on basic x86 instructions and consume very low system memory while also being aware of HyperThreading, multi-processors, and multi-core processors. While the AIDA64 CPU tests really only compare the processor performance more than it measures platforms, it still offers a glimpse into what kind of power each platform possesses.

Queen and Photoworxx tests are synthetic benchmarks that operate the function many times and over-exaggerate by several magnitudes what the real-world performance would be like. The Queen benchmark focuses on the branch prediction capabilities and misprediction penalties of the CPU. It does this by finding possible solutions to the classic queen problem on a chessboard. At the same clock speed theoretically the processor with the shorter pipeline and smaller misprediction penalties will attain higher benchmark scores.

Phenom_II_X4_975_AIDA1.png

The Phenom-II X4-975BE falls right in line with where it should in comparison to the other AMD processors, topping the AMD numbers. When compared to the i5-2500 CPU, the Phenom-II X4-975BE fails to overcome and falls behind by about 22%. When overclocked the Phenom-II X4-975BE closes the gap to about 9%, and comes pretty close to the performance of the Core i7-920 CPU as well.

Like the Queen benchmark, the Photoworxx tests for penalties against pipeline architecture. The synthetic Photoworxx benchmark stresses the integer arithmetic and multiplication execution units of the CPU and also the memory subsystem. Due to the fact that this test performs high memory read/write traffic, it cannot effectively scale in situations where more than two processing threads are used. The AIDA64 Photoworxx benchmark performs the following tasks on a very large RGB image:

  • Fill
  • Flip
  • Rotate90R (rotate 90 degrees CW)
  • Rotate90L (rotate 90 degrees CCW)
  • Random (fill the image with random colored pixels)
  • RGB2BW (color to black & white conversion)
  • Difference
  • Crop

I have noticed over time that the Photoworxx test, unlike most of the other AIDA64 tests, depends a lot on the L3 cache. In this test more than any other, the CPUs that have an L3 cache perform a lot better than those that do not. Once again, the Phenom-II X4-975BE tops the AMD CPUs and this time it even outperforms the newly released Core i5-2500 CPU.

The Zip Library test measures combined CPU and memory subsystem performance through the public ZLib compression library. ZLib is designed as a free lossless data compression library for use on virtually any computer hardware and operating system. The ZLib data format is itself portable across platforms and has a footprint independent of input data that can be reduced at some cost in compression.

Phenom_II_X4_975_AIDA2.png

In the ZLib compression test, the Phenom-II X4-975BE comes very close to the performance of the i5-2500K and even outperforms the Core i7-920. When overclocked, the Phenom-II X4-975BE actually outpaces the new Sandy Bridge CPU.

The AES integer benchmark measures CPU performance using AES data encryption. It utilizes Vincent Rijmen, Antoon Bosselaers and Paulo Barreto's public domain C code in ECB mode and consumes 48 MB of memory.

Phenom_II_X4_975_AIDA3.png

While I normally like to put both of the Everest integer performance tests on one graph, the Core i5-6500K made that impossible this time. With the new Sandy Bridge processors, Intel made some major changes to the way their CPUs handle AES compression. This new processing is a boon to webmasters everywhere, as well as anyone who deals with encrypted files on a regular basis. With that in mind, the Core i5 processor completely destroys the competition in the AES test. The AMD Phenom-II X4 processors both outpace the Core i7-920, and the Phenom-II X4-975BE beats it by a sizable margin.

Phenom_II_X4_975_AIDA4.png

In the floating point tests, the Phenom-II X4-975BE once again beats out the Core i7-920 CPU in the 32-bit and 64-bit tests. In the 128-bit SinJulia tests, it falls behind both the Intel CPUs and, even when overclocked, it can't compete with the Core i5-2500K CPU in any of the tests. The new instructions for floating point processes in the Sandy Bridge CPUs really let the Core i5-2500K take top spot in these tests.



 

Comments 

 
# RE: AMD Phenom-II X4-975 BE CPU HDZ975FBK4DGMDoug 2011-01-04 05:10
Yep. I concur and here is a little testing I did while reading your article:
CPU CPU Clock Motherboard Chipset Memory CL-RCD-RP-RAS Score
4x Core i7 920 HT 3800 MHz Gigabyte GA-X58A-UD5 v2 X58 Triple DDR3-1448 8-8-8-24 CR2
This is a Bloomfield chip.

Passmark 7
CPU Mark: 7884
Memory Mark: 3263
Street Fighter IV: 8934
x264
AVI: 84
MP4: 34

And note that although the 975BE @ 4Ghz comes close to the stock 920 in Queen, it's still about 6% slower and in Photoworxx a full 30%+ slower. That at 4Ghz the best of AMD can only muster what a now lowly 920 can do at 2.66Ghz is pretty sad.
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# SAD You say??Toeringsandthong 2011-02-03 04:42
Hers some food for thought ! whats sad is paying alot more for 920 when you dont have too ! think about it fanboy !
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# RE: AMD Phenom-II X4-975 BEMack 2011-01-04 07:50
Nice review. Thanks for the comparison CPU choices as well.
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# RE: AMD Phenom-II X4-975 BE CPU HDZ975FBK4DGMAthlonite 2011-01-04 18:28
pretty much this CPU has been put out there for us AM2+ users who don't want to OC or don't want x6 10xx CPU's but would like a little more power.... I can't see why any serious upgrader would buy this right before the release of bulldozer based CPU's
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# RE: RE: AMD Phenom-II X4-975 BE CPU HDZ975FBK4DGMAthlonite 2011-01-04 18:35
Oh and I cant believe that my #ty old PII x4 940BE @ 3.4GHz beat out the x4 840 in every test in AIDA64
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# It should beat the 840Hank 2011-01-05 07:35
The X4-840 isn't really a Phenom-II Chip, it's an Athlon-II with the name Phenom-II. The 840 doesn't have any L3 cache and is built on a Propus die. Also, at $102, its a lot cheaper than any of the Phenom-II X4 processors. That your X4-940BE beats it isn't all that surprising.

Feel free to read my review of the Phenom-II X4-840 as well -- #benchmarkreviews.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=662&Itemid=63
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# RE: AMD Phenom-II X4-975 BE CPU HDZ975FBK4DGMnormal 2011-01-05 00:44
I'm very sorry to read this article and still the author is so bent on Intel that he passes the fact that the new Intel chip can't even run on Linux.AMD still does.You so called Intel superchip is'n't that far in front of the 975BE.Only in the encryption it's got some advantages thanks to a lot of compiler tricks.But in plain battlefield Intel sucks big time.Even in the game it loses to an old phenom 2 architecture.Don't teint the truth by using words. Intel sucks!!!!!!!AMD rules!!!!!
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# Read the articleHank 2011-01-05 07:37
If you would have read the article, you would see that I said I preferred the Phenom-II X4-975BE as a gaming CPU over the i5-2500K. Also, the margins were anywhere from 8% to 35% without counting the AES test. I also stated that prior to the Sandy Bridge release, I preferred the ATHLON-II series over the i5 chips. Read the article next time, not just the last page.
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# 975 BE for now, Bulldozer later...nt300 2011-01-05 07:50
There's no bias within this article as some of you may think. Anyway great review and a very good upgrade path for people wanting to stick to the AM2+ and AM3 platforms. I am waiting for Bulldozer, though I would get this chip just to buy me some time in between, but it has to be dirt cheap $$$...
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# MotherboardJosé Luiz 2011-03-06 06:22
I believe the 975 AMD processor is excellent, I would buy one but can not find the motherboard for this processor. Unfortunately, there is the motherboard for this processor on the market.
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# RE: MotherboardOrville 2011-03-06 08:45
You can use any AM3 motherboard for this processor. There are many models available.
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# 975BE BESTGodless 2011-10-05 03:39
I think its good to buy this 3.6 GHZ CPU because it runs like hell ^^ its better than a dream ^^
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# RE: 975BE BESTAthlonite 2011-10-05 06:18
Really you'd spend the extra over an x4 965 or an 955 for that matter

965 + 300MHz OC = stock 975BE and it's the same deneb die you only going to get out of a 975BE what would be attainable from an 965 + a descent cooler
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