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Written by Olin Coles   
Monday, 22 November 2010
Table of Contents: Page Index
ASUS ENGTX580 GeForce GTX 580 Video Card
GeForce GTX 580 Closer Look
GeForce GTX 580 Detailed
Features and Specifications
Video Card Testing Methodology
DX10: 3DMark Vantage
DX10: Crysis Warhead
DX11: Aliens vs Predator
DX11: Battlefield Bad Company 2
DX11: BattleForge
DX11: Lost Planet 2
DX9 SSAO: Mafia II
DX11: Metro 2033
DX11: Tom Clancy's HAWX2
DX11: Unigine Heaven 2.1
ASUS ENGTX580 Overclocking
GeForce GTX 580 Temperatures
VGA Power Consumption
ASUS GeForce GTX 580 Conclusion

VGA Power Consumption

For power consumption tests, Benchmark Reviews utilizes an 80-PLUS GOLD certified OCZ Z-Series Gold 850W PSU, model OCZZ850. This power supply unit has been tested to provide over 90% typical efficiency by Chroma System Solutions. To measure isolated video card power consumption, Benchmark Reviews uses the Kill-A-Watt EZ (model P4460) power meter made by P3 International.

A baseline measurement is taken without any video card installed on our test computer system, which is allowed to boot into Windows 7 and rest idle at the login screen before power consumption is recorded. Once the baseline reading has been taken, the graphics card is installed and the system is again booted into Windows and left idle at the login screen before taking the idle reading. Our final loaded power consumption reading is taken with the video card running a stress test using FurMark. Below is a chart with the isolated video card power consumption (system without video card minus measured total) displayed in Watts for each specified test product:

Video Card Power Consumption by Benchmark Reviews

VGA Product Description

(sorted by combined total power)

Idle Power

Loaded Power

NVIDIA GeForce GTX 480 SLI Set
82 W
655 W
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 590 Reference Design
53 W
396 W
ATI Radeon HD 4870 X2 Reference Design
100 W
320 W
AMD Radeon HD 6990 Reference Design
46 W
350 W
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 295 Reference Design
74 W
302 W
ASUS GeForce GTX 480 Reference Design
39 W
315 W
ATI Radeon HD 5970 Reference Design
48 W
299 W
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 690 Reference Design
25 W
321 W
ATI Radeon HD 4850 CrossFireX Set
123 W
210 W
ATI Radeon HD 4890 Reference Design
65 W
268 W
AMD Radeon HD 7970 Reference Design
21 W
311 W
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 470 Reference Design
42 W
278 W
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 580 Reference Design
31 W
246 W
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 570 Reference Design
31 W
241 W
ATI Radeon HD 5870 Reference Design
25 W
240 W
ATI Radeon HD 6970 Reference Design
24 W
233 W
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 465 Reference Design
36 W
219 W
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 680 Reference Design
14 W
243 W
Sapphire Radeon HD 4850 X2 11139-00-40R
73 W
180 W
NVIDIA GeForce 9800 GX2 Reference Design
85 W
186 W
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 780 Reference Design
10 W
275 W
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 770 Reference Design
9 W
256 W
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 280 Reference Design
35 W
225 W
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 260 (216) Reference Design
42 W
203 W
ATI Radeon HD 4870 Reference Design
58 W
166 W
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 560 Ti Reference Design
17 W
199 W
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 460 Reference Design
18 W
167 W
AMD Radeon HD 6870 Reference Design
20 W
162 W
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 670 Reference Design
14 W
167 W
ATI Radeon HD 5850 Reference Design
24 W
157 W
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 650 Ti BOOST Reference Design
8 W
164 W
AMD Radeon HD 6850 Reference Design
20 W
139 W
NVIDIA GeForce 8800 GT Reference Design
31 W
133 W
ATI Radeon HD 4770 RV740 GDDR5 Reference Design
37 W
120 W
ATI Radeon HD 5770 Reference Design
16 W
122 W
NVIDIA GeForce GTS 450 Reference Design
22 W
115 W
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 650 Ti Reference Design
12 W
112 W
ATI Radeon HD 4670 Reference Design
9 W
70 W
* Results are accurate to within +/- 5W.

The factory overclocked ASUS GeForce GTX 580 video card surprised us with chilly idle and lukewarm loaded temperatures, and the surprises keep coming as we measure power consumption. The GeForce GTX 580 requires one eight-pin and one six-pin PCI-E power connection for proper operation. Resting at idle with no GPU load, the ASUS GeForce GTX 580 consumed a modest 31W by our measure. Compensating for a small margin of error, this falls roughly in-line with idle power draw from the GeForce 8800 GT and slightly less than the GeForce GTX 280 or GTX 465. Most notably, it's considerably lower than the GF100 inside the GeForce GTX 480... by nearly 26%.

Once 3D-applications begin to demand power from the GPU, electrical power consumption climbs. Because the GeForce GTX 580 uses a new hardware power monitoring technology not included on previous GeForce models, we've had to work around the power-throttling effects enabled with FurMark or OCCT. To do so, we merely renamed Furmark.exe to Crysis.exe and changed some file names and locations. Measured at full throttle with FurMark's 3D 'torture' load, the GeForce GTX 580 topped out at 245W maximum power draw. NVIDIA's stated max TDP is 244W, which is falls within our measurements - even once efficiency rating and margin of error are factored in.

Oddly enough, using ASUS Voltage Tweak to over-volt the ENGTX580 up to 925 MHz didn't exactly translate into higher power consumption. In fact, our average maximum readings were only 1-2 watts above the standard TDP. I realize that increasing from 962 mV to 1145 mV isn't a huge change, but I actually expected the power consumption to rise accordingly. While the idle power draw is identical to older models like the GeForce 8800 GT, it's better than the GeForce GTX 280 and more recent GTX 465 models. At full power load the GeForce GTX 580 matches up to the ATI Radeon HD 5870, but still operates well below the levels of a Radeon HD 5970.



 

Comments 

 
# RE: ASUS ENGTX580 GeForce GTX 580 Video CardHarry 2010-11-22 20:42
What a waste of money to be honest to spend $550 bucks on a card which will be beaten within a few months- this thing is nearly as fast as 6850CF
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# RE: RE: ASUS ENGTX580 GeForce GTX 580 Video CardOlin Coles 2010-11-22 22:05
Harry, not everyone wants to buy two 6850's and have no upgrade path a year or two later. So you might reconsider who's wasting money.
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# RE: RE: RE: ASUS ENGTX580 GeForce GTX 580 Video CardHarry 2010-11-23 03:14
Olin, in two years time you'll be wanting to change your motherboard as well because the new PCIE interface is already in works. Also there aren't many heavy games around to justify an expensive upgrade. I mean a 5870 can easily handle games for up to two more years. The real upgrade mania comes when there is a game or a multimedia application to justify an upgrade, all these chip manufacturers are going through serious financial issues that's why they bring out newer models even when there isn't any demand.
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# RE: RE: RE: RE: ASUS ENGTX580 GeForce GTX 580 Video CardOlin Coles 2010-11-23 14:26
See my reply to Gordon, below.

Using your own example, if someone is to purchase a new motherboard simply for the benefit of a new PCI-E 3.0 specification, which entails a new processor and possibly memory, why wouldn't they also buy the best graphics card now? You can't have it both ways, Harry.
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# RE: RE: RE: RE: ASUS ENGTX580 GeForce GTX 580 Video CardTom 2010-11-24 04:56
Harry, even if the GTX580 is a bit slower than 6850CF and costs a little bit more, there's still the issue of Multi-card configurations CF/SLI being substantially more complicated than single card.
Just take a look inside any ATI/nvidia release notes and you'll see that the vast majority of bugs are in multi-card configurations.
I'm willing to sacrifices 10% performance and pay 10% more for the more simple/compatible option.
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# justifyclaydough 2011-01-31 22:21
As an artist dreaming for a next gen 2.0 that can someday match what an "army" of creative types can achieve...
( not only in resolution but in pure/massive imaginary scope )
This attitude is very de-moralizing.
Why even read a graphic card benchmark review if you live for the "status quo"? Just git yerself a console and button mash to that.
The graphic card arms race assures me a future with tesselation, vsm soft shadows, and
global illumination:
##youtube.com/watch?v=Dd8yMPZzWfE&feature=related
none of which is or will be ready for prime time if we don't fan the flames.
The product is coming.
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# RE: ASUS ENGTX580 GeForce GTX 580 Video CardDavid Ramsey 2010-11-22 20:59
Um, be beaten in a few months by what, exactly? And how do you know that whatever upcoming wonder card might beat it will be priced anywhere near it? As a hardware geek who must have the latest and greatest, I welcome whatever ATI can come up with in response. Right now, the GTX580's combination of power, noise, and low temps is unbeatable.
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# superTrajan Long 2010-11-22 21:15
Crushes AMD's single GPU like roadkill. SLI is unbeatable. Great image quality and CUDA. IN many games 580 minimums are better than 5970. Smoother gameplay all around.
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# SuccellusFranck 2010-11-23 04:12
Great article cover the single card contenders and the SLI that could and can match it.
Its clear its not worth yet buying it unless you dont thrust SLI and you have power consuption/heat issues.
BUT, since SLI is only relevant in few games its a factor to be considered.
Many already rushed to the market to buy the vanilla 580, i suppose many more will go to the premium that are coming.
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# Worth it to doRealNeil 2010-11-23 09:06
It's worth the money if you have it, and I probably wouldn't over clock it either. It run well enough at stock, and if I want more performance then I'll buy another one of them. I had decided earlier on that I was going to but two GTX460's and put them into SLI for my new PC, but this card is smarter for me, so it's what I'll get.
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# RE: ASUS ENGTX580 GeForce GTX 580 Video CardGordon 2010-11-23 14:00
Harry is making a very simple point that I think you are looking past in defense of being a techy like we all most likely are. The card may be great but the cost is too high and the performance over earlier cards isnt enough to justify spending another 3-5 hundred dollars a couple times a year to stay up to date. Technology moves forward at a quick rate but the improvements are very incremental, not large leaps. For each incremental improvement they pump out a new card and charge top dollar for it and add a higher number to the end of the cards type IE GTX - 260/270/280/290/blah blah blah 460/470/480 blah blah 580. I still own dual 260's and have no problems playing all the new games at an appealing framerate. When DX 11 becomes the absolute standard for games and games demand it then I will upgrade. But why stay ahead of the technology train when the tracks that guide it havent been built yet?
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# RE: RE: ASUS ENGTX580 GeForce GTX 580 Video CardOlin Coles 2010-11-23 14:23
This isn't my first high-end video card review. I've been testing top level graphics cards for over four years, and every single time it's the same argument and complaint. It's a stale topic that I've written about at length, which I doubt you or Harry has ever read, so I'll summarize for you: They don't continue to make Ferrari's and Lamborghini's because they're fuel efficient or economic, the make them because people will buy them. To this end, high-end video cards will always have a market. It may not be the majority market which is filled with integrated graphics and casual computer users, and it may not be the mainstream graphics market that spawns from these high-end successes, but it?s a big enough market to continue pushing the envelope.

Additionally, you claim that software doesn't exist to warrant the need for products like the GTX 580, and I believe this to be untrue. Have you ever tried playing Crysis with all the graphical glory it was designed with? How about Metro 2033, Lost Planet 2, or Mafia II? Sure, you can play them with PhysX disabled and AA/AF turned down low, but that's like watching movies in standard definition. The logic of this argument also means that DVD and Blu-ray are unnecessary technologies, and VHS was 'good enough'. Not everybody wants to stand still... some of us enjoy the slow march forward.
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# *THOROUGH*Zack 2010-11-24 07:06
The last two reviews (the general 580 and this one) were incredibly thorough and useful. The tools used, the descriptions, the overclocked charts, price per FPS per game, etc. were all GREATLY appreciated by this humbled little nerd. Even the comments were knowledgable and delivered in a useful way.

THANK YOU VERY MUCH for this review. I hope you get a raise.
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# Tricky Spot...BeerGutBarry 2010-11-25 01:54
I love the new GTX 580, but can get the new Gigabyte 480 SOC for a bit cheaper...torn.

Curious to see how far partners can push this card though. The improvements made to the 480 from release to now have been pretty impressive, so wondering if similar gains can be made with the 580, or if this is already pushing the limit (without causing a massive increase in power consumption and removing throttling).
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# RE: Tricky Spot...Olin Coles 2010-11-25 04:57
If it's a choice between the GTX 580 and GTX 480 SOC, I'd jump on the GTX 580 in an instant.
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# how can i spend 770$ ??LASER 2010-11-25 03:26
Right Olin!! yea i dont wanna feel that my card is struggling to play the best game i liked..looking at tesselation video that was just to explain the idea.... coming game might share something which wont feel like u playing a game...so tesselating hardware i decided...

GTX 580 in India is for 770$ !!!
GTX 570 will be at 520$ for me....
i saw ferrari ships for 20$-84$ if u order some merchandise...
So is there any chances i can get that GTX 580 in 550$ here???
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# Great ReviewWarren 2010-11-25 12:54
Great review. I bought two of these, thus proving that there are people out there who will buy the very best regardless of cost.

As you rightly mention, Ferrari do not make cars that are the most fuel efficient at 60Mph, they know that there are buyers out there who want the best at any price.
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# To Ferrari or Not FerrariRickard 2010-12-06 02:14
Weird review, mixing crossfire/sli scores with normal setups. Would have been more easily understood if you had had a separate table for cf/sli setups.

Also it would be interesting to see the scores mapped to a dollar/performance index to see where the best gain is to be had.

Further its interesting that the cf/sli scores are slightly different with other reviews where the 580 consistently (well almost) had scored lower than the 5970.

I know many think hey its a dual gpu card but hey it costs less and you can still cf/sli it so I dont really see the point they are trying to make.

Imo Nvidia is on the right track and the 460 and 580 is really good cards but atm they are basically catching up and I am waiting to see what the response from AMD is before I commit to an upgrade.
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# fast new cards?Laszlo 2010-12-10 08:21
For me, a top card is one which beat the older top dog. But none of the new cards doing this (eg. none of them beat the GTX295's raw power: most of them slower except in 1-2 titles),even if they equipped much faster ram, clocked higher,... I would like to see a GTX295 manufactured with 40nm process, GDDR5 mems, 512bit wide mem bus, clocked as high as the new cards. What would touch it in DX10? So we get new feats (which maybe could be SW rendered too..) but not speed. Like 470 -> 570: most of the 25-27% speed advantage of the 570 gained from higher clock speed and just fragments from any optimization and the one less disabled CUDA or other unit. From another point of view: it's not a coincident that first came the slower 480 (vs. 580), then 470 (crippled) then 580 with more MHz, then 570.. maybe we will see a 680 too if the 40nm process allows more than 1 GHz - as a new, very advanced chip of course (which is internally the same). We getting the same, only the price/crippling ratio changes. We are very far away from ray traced rendering, real physics, real materials, ballistics, etc.
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# RE: fast new cards?Olin Coles 2010-12-10 08:29
I might be misunderstanding your message, so allow me to seek clarification. Are you saying a GeForce GTX 295 outperforms the GTX 580? Just so that you know, it really doesn't even come close. Here's exhibit A: benchmarkreviews.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=403

If the Radeon HD 5970 can clear it by 35-40% in Crysis and Heaven, then look at where the GTX 580 sits against the Radeon 5970 on those tests in this article.
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# RE: ASUS ENGTX580 GeForce GTX 580 Video CardLaszlo 2010-12-10 10:38
Yes I was misunderstable. Clock to clock (same GPU/Mem) the 580 would be slower. Or: the 295 would be much faster, manufactured @ 40nm process and set to same clock speeds with same memory modules. = We don't get what nv can make, we get crippled cards - but with new feats. If the 580 would get the GTX285's 512 bit wide memory bus (the 295 also crippled to 448 bit, and from 32 to 28 ROPs per GPU), and 2048 MB memory, 64 ROPs, etc (as it's double number of transistors dictate), then it would be a real high end (technology wise) card. Now it's a very fast card, that milk the consumers like a cow, then nv needs to 'invent' some of their inventions again and we never get a new generation of cards that 100 or more percent faster than their precedessors. When they made their first(?), the Riva128(?) then there was no other just their best chip, and it was blown away by their next, faster chip. Not by one more feat, but by raw power - in ALL games.
Sadly they make only high end chips these days too, then crippling them down to a price category.
So these new cards are fast but far less than they should be - and they should be 50-100% faster in everything, especially in 'future' games that really use their new feats.
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# Nice reviewThomas 2011-01-15 14:42
Very nice review, well done. Thanks very much! That'll be about it...greetings
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# To Olin ColesGordon 2011-01-31 22:59
Olin,

Hey, so to clarify I was only trying to make what Harry was saying a little more clear as I assumed there was some misunderstanding. I agree with you in every way as to what you replied, and I should say that your comparison to Ferrari and Lamroghini was spot on. I am definately in the casual group but not by choice, lol. I would, if i could afford, like to stay up with all the newest hardware as I am a firm believer that your rig is only as strong as its weakest component. My gtx 260's: Do they play even Crysis on appealing settings at a decent enough frame rate? Yes I can push them to relatively high settings and play at about 30 or more FPS. BUUUUUT I want a GTX 580 so I can crank that up just as much as the next guy HAHA. Either way I liked your review and found it very informative.
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