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Written by Hank Tolman   
Thursday, 11 November 2010
Table of Contents: Page Index
MSI N450GTS Cyclone 1GD5/OC Video Card
Closer Look: MSI GeForce GTS 450
N450GTS Cyclone Detailed Features
Video Card Testing Methodology
DX10: 3DMark Vantage
DX10: Street Fighter IV
DX10: Far Cry 2
DX10: Resident Evil 5
DX11: Aliens vs Predator
DX11: Battlefield Bad Company 2
DX11: Lost Planet 2
DX11: Unigine Heaven 2.2
MSI N450GTS Cyclone Temperatures
VGA Power Consumption
Overclocking the GTS 450
GeForce GTS 450 Final Thoughts
MSI N450GTS Cyclone Conclusion

DX10: Resident Evil 5

Built upon an advanced version of Capcom's proprietary MT Framework game engine to deliver DirectX-10 graphic detail, Resident Evil 5 offers gamers non-stop action similar to Devil May Cry 4, Lost Planet, and Dead Rising. The MT Framework is an exclusive seventh generation game engine built to be used with games developed for the PlayStation 3 and Xbox 360, and PC ports. MT stands for "Multi-Thread", "Meta Tools" and "Multi-Target". Games using the MT Framework are originally developed on the PC and then ported to the other two console platforms.

On the PC version of Resident Evil 5, both DirectX 9 and DirectX-10 modes are available for Microsoft Windows XP and Vista Operating Systems. Microsoft Windows 7 will play Resident Evil with backwards compatible Direct3D APIs. Resident Evil 5 is branded with the NVIDIA The Way It's Meant to be Played (TWIMTBP) logo, and receives NVIDIA GeForce 3D Vision functionality enhancements.

NVIDIA and Capcom offer the Resident Evil 5 benchmark demo for free download from their website, and Benchmark Reviews encourages visitors to compare their own results to ours. Because the Capcom MT Framework game engine is very well optimized and produces high frame rates, Benchmark Reviews uses the DirectX-10 version of the test at 1920x1080 resolution. High quality settings are configured, with 8x MSAA post processing effects for high demand on the GPU. Test scenes from Area #3 and Area #4 require the most graphics processing power, and the results are collected for the chart illustrated below.

MSI_N450GTS_RE5.jpg

Cost Analysis: Resident Evil 5 (Area 4)

  • $115 GeForce GTS 250 512MB (9800GTX+) = $3.13 per FPS
  • $140 GeForce GTS 450 1GB (MSI Cyclone) = $3.20 per FPS
  • $145 Radeon HD 5770 1GB (PowerColor 1GBD5-PPVG2) = $3.74 per FPS
  • $260 GeForce GTX 285 1GB = $3.70 per FPS

Test Summary: The Resident Evil 5 benchmark, though also a CAPCOM title, appears to be a little tougher on the GPUs than the Street Fighter IV benchmark. Areas #3 and #4 are the most graphically demanding in this benchmark, so we have charted those two scenes. Area #3 gives us similary results to many of the other DX10 titles, but the less demanding area #4 shows the Radeon HD 5770 with the advantage, and by a sizeable margin of nearly 11%. The Resident Evil 5 tests looks a lot like the 3DMark Vantage test in that the more graphically challenging area is harder on the Radeon card while the less demanding area is harder on the MSI N450GTS Cyclone. Even with the advantage, however, the slightly lower price of the MSI GTS 450 gives it a better price per FPS. Let's take a look at some DX11 titles before we make a final decision on the matter.

Graphics Card

GeForce 9800 GTX+

GeForce GTX285

GeForce GTS450

PowerColor Radeon HD 5770 PPG

GPU Cores

128

240

192

800

Core Clock (MHz)

740

670

850

875

Shader Clock (MHz)

1836

1550

1700

N/A

Memory Clock (MHz)

1100

1300

1000

1225

Memory Amount

512 MB GDDR3

1024MB GDDR3

1024MB GDDR3

1024MB GDDR5

Memory Interface

256-bit

512-bit

128-bit

128-bit



 

Comments 

 
# RE: MSI N450GTS Cyclone 1GD5/OC Video CardRealNeil 2010-11-11 09:55
"CUDA and PhysX compatibility may be a deal breaker if you are interested in these things"

I feel like it's something that I have to be interested in. We don't know how many new game developers will cleave to these standards yet. So buying a card that can't display either one is not the smart choice as I see it. If both ATI and NVIDIA could do both, then the choice would come down to performance and power/heat issues. That isn't the case.

The few games that I have now with CUDA and PhysX enabled are nice eye-candy and I like the technology.

Thanks for another good review.
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