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Written by Bruce Normann   
Thursday, 15 July 2010
Table of Contents: Page Index
ASUS M4A88TD-V EVO/USB3 Motherboard
AMD 880G Chipset Overview
ASUS AMD-880G Series Features
ASUS M4A88TD-V EVO/USB3 Specifications
Closer Look: M4A88TD-V EVO/USB3
ASUS M4A88TD-V EVO/USB3 Details
ASUS BIOS and Overclocking
Motherboard Testing Methodology
EVEREST Benchmark Results
PCMark Vantage Test Results
CINEBENCH 11.5 Benchmark
Passmark Performance Test Benchmark
Crysis Test Results
Aliens vs. Predator Test Results
Motherboard Final Thoughts
ASUS M4A88TD-V EVO/USB3 Conclusion

Crysis Test Results

Crysis uses a new graphics engine: the CryENGINE2, which is the successor to Far Cry's CryENGINE. CryENGINE2 is among the first engines to use the Direct3D 10 (DirectX10) framework of Windows Vista, but can also run using DirectX9, both on Vista and Windows XP.

Roy Taylor, Vice President of Content Relations at NVIDIA, has spoken on the subject of the engine's complexity, stating that Crysis has over a million lines of code, 1GB of texture data, and 85,000 shaders. To get the most out of modern multicore processor architectures, CPU intensive subsystems of CryENGINE 2 such as physics, networking and sound, have been re-written to support multi-threading.

Crysis offers an in-game benchmark tool, and this short test does place some high amounts of stress on a graphics card, since there are so many landscape features rendered. For benchmarking purposes, Crysis can mean trouble as it places a high demand on both GPU and CPU resources. Benchmark Reviews uses the Crysis Benchmark Tool by Mad Boris to test frame rates in batches, which allows the results of many tests to be averaged.

Low-resolution testing allows the graphics processor to plateau at its maximum output performance, which shifts demand onto the other system components. At the lower resolutions Crysis will reflect the GPU's top-end speed in the composite score, indicating full-throttle performance with little load. This makes for a less GPU-dependant test environment, and is helpful in creating a baseline for measuring maximum system performance. At the lowest 800x600 resolution available, frame rate performance often becomes entirely CPU dependant.

ASUS_M4A88TD-V_EVO_USB3_Motherboard_Crysis.jpg

Crysis is well known for putting a substantial load on the CPU as well as the GPU, so it's a good test when you want a more balanced performance measurement. With no Multi-Sample-Anti-Aliasing enabled, the best P55/i5-750 performance is 9% better than the best AMD 790FX/720BE score. At its default clock setting of 3.2 GHz, the AMD 880G/555BE system takes a big hit in performance, over 10 FPS. Crank up the bus speed and the CPU multiplier, though, and it settles in half way between its two competitors, at 56.0 FPS.

Once some MSAA was turned on and turned up to 4x, the test becomes more GPU dependant, but it's interesting that the 880G/555BE turned in both the lowest and highest frame rates. Clearly, the CPU clock and the FSB (or equivalent) clock has a significant impact on Crysis; more than the number of cores and computational efficiency of the CPU. Turning up the wick on the 880G/555BE combination resulted in 18% and 16% increases in frame rates for the two tests. At higher resolutions, the differences were negligible, at least with the single HD 5870 video card I used for all the tests.

Crysis is the "Old man" of gaming benchmarks; let's take a look at one of the latest releases, Aliens vs. Predator and see if we can detect some CPU influence there.



 

Comments 

 
# Good review, dubious comparisonsBernardP 2010-07-21 07:22
A well-written, detailed review, with good explanations of the features of this particular motherboard. However, knowing that the i5-750 eats Phenoms quad-cores for breakfast, showing comparative benchmarks of the i5-750 with X2 and X3 Phenoms is not representative.

I would have liked to see comparative benchmarks involving a Phenom II X4 945, which has the same 95W TDP as the 15-750.

Also, there are no comments about the Core Unlocking and Turbo Core performance.
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# AgreedBruce Normann 2010-07-21 08:18
I would have prefered to compare apples-to-apples on the CPU, but I used what I had available. For this board, I actually would have liked to compare one of the new Clarksdale CPUs from Intel either the Pentium G6950 Clarkdale 2.8GHz or the Core i3-530 Clarkdale 2.93GHz. They're on either side of the price for the X2 555BE I tested with. I had a Core2Duo Wolfdale in house, but that's not really comparable.

My X2 chip wouldn't unlock unfortunately, so I can't offer performance comparisons for the Core Unlocker. The Turbo Unlocker is tough to measure accurately, as it is dynamic and doesn't always respond the same way every time. I will try and do some more testing and will update the review if I can get reliable results.

Thanks for the feedback.
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# RE: AgreedBernardP 2010-07-21 10:30
Thanks for you reply and explanations. Interesting to know your Phenom X2 sample wouldn't unlock. Many people seem to think that X2 and X3 processors *have* to unlock and feel cheated when they don't.
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# AMD GamerPhil Holmes 2011-04-07 18:24
##facebook.com/DJ.Decibels.4DFx#!/photo.php?fbid=10150548993280384&set=a.10150548993275384.648430.543020383&theater

Benchmark ASUS M4A88TD-V EVO with 4GB DDR3 1333MHz / AMD PhenomII x4 965 Black Edition 124w
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