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Written by Bruce Normann   
Sunday, 13 June 2010
Table of Contents: Page Index
ASUS Radeon EAH5870 V2 Video Card
Radeon HD 5870 GPU Features
ASUS EAH5870 V2 Features
ASUS EAH5870/2DIS/1GD5/V2 Specifications
Closer Look: ASUS Radeon HD5870 V2
Detailed Features: ASUS EAH5870 V2
Video Card Testing Methodology
3DMark Vantage Benchmarks
Crysis Benchmark Results
Battlefield: Bad Company 2 Benchmark Results
Devil May Cry 4 Benchmark
Aliens Vs. Predator DX11 Benchmark Results
Far Cry 2 Benchmarks
Resident Evil 5 Benchmarks
Unigine - Heaven Benchmarks
S.T.A.L.K.E.R.: Call of Pripyat Benchmarks
ASUS EAH5870 V2 Temperature
VGA Power Consumption
Radeon HD 5870 Final Thoughts
ASUS EAH5870 V2 Conclusion

Battlefield: Bad Company 2 Benchmark Results

The Battlefield franchise has been known to demand a lot from PC graphics hardware. DICE (Digital Illusions CE) has incorporated their Frostbite-1.5 game engine with Destruction-2.0 feature set with Battlefield: Bad Company 2. Battlefield: Bad Company 2 features destructible environments using Frostbit Destruction-2.0, and adds gravitational bullet drop effects for projectiles shot from weapons at a long distance. The Frostbite-1.5 game engine used on Battlefield: Bad Company 2 consists of DirectX-10 primary graphics, with improved performance and softened dynamic shadows added for DirectX-11 users.

At the time Battlefield: Bad Company 2 was published, DICE was also working on the Frostbite-2.0 game engine. This upcoming engine will include native support for DirectX-10.1 and DirectX-11, as well as parallelized processing support for 2-8 parallel threads. This will improve performance for users with an Intel Core-i7 processor.

In our benchmark tests of Battlefield: Bad Company 2, the first three minutes of action in the single-player raft night scene are captured with FRAPS. Relative to the online multiplayer action, these frame rate results are nearly identical to daytime maps with the same video settings.

ASUS_EAH5870v2_Video_Card_Battlefield_Bad_Company2_1920.jpg

BF:BC2 shows that DirectX10 need not be the death card for NVIDIA GeForce products; the Frostbite-1.5 game engine is partial to NVIDIA products over ATI, despite AMD's sponsorship of the game. In Battlefield: Bad Company 2, a substantially overclocked GeForce GTX275 matches right up with the ATI Radeon HD5830 running standard clocks. The mildly overclocked GeForce GTX285 improves on that performance by 8%, but the stock HD 5870 beats that by about 20 FPS, almost a 50% gain. Of course, cranking the EAH5870 up to 1 GHz puts the crowning touch on it, with an average frame rate of 68 FPS. BF:BC2 is definitely playable, with all the settings maxed out, at that level of performance.

I know general purpose computing uses a very small fraction of the power contained in today's average PC, but it does seem that gaming applications are at least trying to push the envelope. Playing this game with the previous generation of graphics cards is a complete waste of time and effort. Some of that is attributable to advances in 3D Graphics APIs (application programming interfaces) like DirectX11, but at some level the game developers have to make decisions about how much detail to include in the scenes, and how realistically to render soft surfaces like skin and water. I know some of the improvements may look minimal or insignificant when perusing the promotional screenshots, but they all add up, in the final result. Bring it on, I say. I'll find some other use for that old HD 4850 graphics card.

In our next section, Benchmark Reviews tests with Devil May Cry 4 Benchmark. Read on to see how a blended high-demand GPU test with low video frame buffer demand will impact our test products.

Product Series

Stream Processors

Core Clock (MHz)

Shader Clock (MHz)

Memory Clock (MHz)

Memory Amount

Memory Interface

ASUS Radeon HD4850 (EAH4850 TOP)

800

680

N/A

1050

512MB GDDR3

256-bit

ATI Radeon HD5770 (Engineering Sample)

800

850

N/A

1200

1.0GB GDDR5

128-bit

XFX Radeon HD5830 (HD-583X-ZNFV)

1120

800

N/A

1000

1.0GB GDDR5

256-bit

ASUS GeForce GTX 260 (ENGTX260 MATRIX)

216

576

1242

999

896MB GDDR3

448-bit

XFX Radeon HD5850 (21162-00-50R)

1440

725

N/A

1000

1.0GB GDDR5

256-bit

MSI GeForce GTX 275 (N275GTX Twin Frozr OC)

240

666

1476

1161

896MB GDDR3

448-bit

ASUS GeForce GTX 285 (GTX285 MATRIX)

240

662

1476

1242

1.0GB GDDR3

512-bit

XFX Radeon HD5870 (HD-587X-ZNFC)

1600

850

N/A

1200

1.0GB GDDR5

256-bit

ASUS Radeon HD5870-Overclocked (EAH5870/2DIS/1GD5/V2)

1600

1000

N/A

1250

1.0GB GDDR5

256-bit



 

Comments 

 
# Excellent reviewAdos 2010-06-16 09:05
Excellent review, one of the best I have ever red on a graphics card. Perfectly examined power section, built quality, overclockability. Do you think will I be able to run this card overclocked in my system? I think it would be ok, but maybe wee bit close to maximum for my powersuply. I run QX9650 at 3.5 GHZ (10.5 x 333 on Gigabyte mATX G31 ESL2 board, 2x2GB DDR2 corsair DHX, and the most important - PSU Enermax MODU82+ II 525W with 3x12V 25 amps on each but 40 amps maximum combined. Thank you for your opinion. And once more what a GREAT REVIEW!!!
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# Thanks.Bruce Normann 2010-06-16 11:32
Thanks for the positives...it's always appreciated. Your Enermax is an excellent PSU, and it should do the job. My only concern is if you are doing Folding or Benchmarks all the time. Even then, the total PSU load will probably stay under 400W.

BTW, I was reading that one of the 12V rails is dedicated to a single PCI-E connector, while the other two are sharing the current between PCI-e and the MOLEX and SATA connectors, so verify that and use the dedicated connection if you can.
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# Also....Bruce Normann 2010-06-16 14:12
The ASUS EAH5870 V2 comes with an adapter cable to convert two 6-pin PCI-e cable to one 8-pin connector. If you use this adapter, you will be spreading the load on all three rails.
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# Thank you!Ados 2010-06-16 18:03
Thank you very much for quick reply and advice. Much appreciate it. Just to clarify things, here is a picture of 12V rails layout - ##anandtech.com/show/2487/6 - so considering that I have two graphics sockets connectors on the PSU and two cables to connect them to of which one of the cable has only one 6+2 pin connector and the other cable has 2x 6+2 pin connectors I should plug the 6+2 pin connector to outer one dedicated graphics power socket on the PSU and the second cable with 2x 6+2 pin connectors to the inner graphics power socket and then spread that output by using and included adapter to convert those 2x 6+2 pin cable to 1x8 pin cable to spread the load properly, right? But I wont be probably spreading the output on all three rails anyway because one 12V rail according to the pictures in the link is probably dedicated to CPU only. Am I correct? Thank you for your seamless advice and help.
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# Or the otherwayAdos 2010-06-16 18:31
When I looked at that picture with power distribution on 12V rails again ( ##anandtech.com/show/2487/6 ) I think all what is needed is actually connect that 2x 6+2 pin cable to inner graphics power sockets on the PSU because I think its obvious that that one combines both 12V2 and 12V3 rails and then just plug that 2x 6+2 pin cable to the graphics card. What do you think?
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# Looked CloserBruce Normann 2010-06-16 20:36
Your right, each red connector on the PSU has both rails contained in it. 12V2 is dedicated to the grphics cards only. It's the one with the yellow sleeve on the internal wiring, and when you plug the connector in, on the outside of the unit, it will be the set of wires closest to the edge. I would use that for the 8-pin connection, and the other set (12V3) for the 6-pin.
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# re: Looked CloserAdos 2010-06-16 22:49
I think only the inner red connector has both 12V2 and 12V3 rails and to that one I will plug that cable which splits into two 6+2 pin PIC-e cables. Enermax did a good job marking the wires on that cable so its obvious which one of two 6+2 pin connectors will use the 12V2 and which 12V3 and as you said I will use the 6+2 pin on 12V2 to power the 8pin on the card and the another 6+2 pin will use 12V3 and I will plug it to 6pin on the card. BTW: I am going to use this card in this mATX case - ##tomshardware.com/reviews/4-barebone-cases-compared,1901-5.html - its so smartly designed that it can take even such a long card even with connector placed where they are on that card. Sorry for any confusions and thank you very much for your time and effort as well as for prompt replies and advices. Thanks to the discussion with you I understand it now and have the correct idea how to plug that card into my PSU in the best way possible. Wish you all the best in whatever you do! :-]
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# RE: ASUS Radeon EAH5870 V2 Video CardxGreg 2010-06-16 18:59
Bruce Excellent review.

I just bought this card (After reading your review), but now I'm VERY worried about if my power supply (Corsair VX550W) can handle this card...

My System:

Q9650 Stock
Gigabyte GA-EP45-UD3P
2x2GB DDR2 1066MHZ OCZ Reaper Series
Western Digital Caviar Black 1TB
Western Digital Caviar Green 500GB
Western Digital Caviar Green 2TB
Zalman 9700NT
Antec 900 (4 Fans 120mm, 1 Fan 200mm)

Thank you for your consideration of this matter.
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# I wouldn't worryBruce Normann 2010-06-16 20:40
I actually own one of these, and it is rock solid. Even theough it is not modular, it has the exact cables you need for this graphics card, one 6-pin and one 6+2 pin. Check out the review on jonnyguru.
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# RE: I wouldn't worryxGreg 2010-06-17 23:52
Thank you for you answer.

You said maximum power draw of this card is 265 (395-130) watts when running full out. What do you mean with 395 watts? Total System Power Consumption?

Maybe the power supply will work too forced? Or Maybe will work too forced if I overclock my CPU and Graphic Card?

Perhaps it will reduce the life of the power supply? I've been told when used heavily or over an extended period of time (1+ years) a power supply will slowly lose some of its initial wattage capacity.

My PSU is two years old, and I use it 24/7.

Thank you for your consideration of this matter.
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# Total System PowerBruce Normann 2010-06-18 06:46
The entire system used a total 395 watts of power from the wall receptacle while running FurMark. This is an extreme load for the video card, and you would not see that kind of sustained load while gaming.

What are you running on the PC during the 24/7? Is it just idling most of the time, or are you running applications that put a significant load on the PC?

At 80% load, your PSU will probably only last 10 years.....just a guess.
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# RE: Total System PowerxGreg 2010-06-18 16:37
Hello again Bruce, and thank you for your answer. I really appreciate it.

And Yes, Is it just idling most of the time. However, I play games almost every night and weekends. Very Demanding games like Bad Company 2 for example.

I have another question about your review. Does the CPU is also in full load? Or is it just the graphics card?

I've been thinking, and I think my supply might not be sufficient in the near future, when I change my current processor for an i7 or add a sound card, etc.. Am I right?

I dont know whether to buy a new psu or stay with the one I have.

What would you do if you were in my situation??
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# Your Upgrade PathBruce Normann 2010-06-19 22:01
Well, if I was on an upgrade path like what you describe, I would probably start looking for a good deal on a Corsair HX 850. In the mean time, why don't you buy one of the KILL A WATT power meters, and try stressing your system with Furmark and OCCT? They are only about $25... Then you will KNOW what your VX550 is up against. OCCT will print graphs of all the major system voltages (12V, 5V, 3.3V...) and you will see for yourself if it is holding up at the highest possible loads for YOUR system, not someone else's.

You can recoup some of your costs by selling the VX550, as it has a very good reputation.
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# RE: Your Upgrade PathxGreg 2010-06-20 19:17
Hello again Bruce.

I'n going to buy a new PSU, and will be a Corsair HX750 from Amazon. I think a Corsair HX850 is too much (Power and Price lol), unless I get $ 20 extra.

Thank you for everything ;)
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# Alternative PSUBruce Normann 2010-06-16 20:55
BTW, for anyone who absolutely cannot power this, or any other powerful card (Fermi, Cough Cough!).... Thermaltake makes a neat PCI-e only (12V DC) power supply that fits in two 5.25" bays and provides 650 watts just to the graphics card(s): ****thermaltakeusa.com/Product.aspx?C=1265&ID=1544 It has modular connections, so cable management is good, too. Folks mainly use it for building dedicated folding machines, where they run quad-SLI.
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# Will this card support 3 MonitorLAMCS 2010-12-19 14:11
Will this card supported 3 monitor???

EAH5870/2DIS/1GD5/V2

what does it meant of 2DIS-----> is that meant will just support 2 monitor???
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# RE: Will this card support 3 MonitorOlin Coles 2010-12-19 14:20
If they are all DisplayPort models, you can connect three monitors. Otherwise, this video card will not support three DVI monitors.
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# good upgrade?douwe 2010-12-30 03:33
hey guys i just have to ask what you guys think

atm i am running my system with a eah4870/512mb dk edition

wil it show a good increase in performance??
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# RE: good upgrade?Olin Coles 2011-01-01 10:09
The 5870 will show a tremendous increase in performance over the 4870... but if you read the reviews you would already know that.
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