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Written by Bruce Normann   
Friday, 26 March 2010
Table of Contents: Page Index
XFX Radeon HD5830 DX11 Video Card
XFX Radeon HD5830 Features
ATI Radeon HD5830 Specifications
Closer Look: XFX Radeon HD 5830
Detailed Features: XFX Radeon HD 5830
Video Card Testing Methodology
3DMark Vantage Benchmarks
Crysis Benchmark Results
Devil May Cry 4 Benchmark
Far Cry 2 Benchmarks
Resident Evil 5 Benchmarks
Unigine - Heaven Benchmarks
S.T.A.L.K.E.R.: Call of Pripyat Benchmarks
XFX Radeon HD5830 Temperature
VGA Power Consumption
Radeon HD 5830 Final Thoughts
XFX Radeon HD 5830 Conclusion

3DMark Vantage Benchmark Results

3DMark Vantage is a computer benchmark by Futuremark (formerly named Mad Onion) to determine the DirectX 10 performance of 3D game performance with graphics cards. A 3DMark score is an overall measure of your system's 3D gaming capabilities, based on comprehensive real-time 3D graphics and processor tests. By comparing your score with those submitted by millions of other gamers you can see how your gaming rig performs, making it easier to choose the most effective upgrades or finding other ways to optimize your system.

There are two graphics tests in 3DMark Vantage: Jane Nash (Graphics Test 1) and New Calico (Graphics Test 2). The Jane Nash test scene represents a large indoor game scene with complex character rigs, physical GPU simulations, multiple dynamic lights, and complex surface lighting models. It uses several hierarchical rendering steps, including for water reflection and refraction, and physics simulation collision map rendering. The New Calico test scene represents a vast space scene with lots of moving but rigid objects and special content like a huge planet and a dense asteroid belt.

At Benchmark Reviews, we believe that synthetic benchmark tools are just as valuable as video games, but only so long as you're comparing apples to apples. Since the same test is applied in the same controlled method with each test run, 3DMark is a reliable tool for comparing graphic cards against one-another.

1680x1050 is rapidly becoming the new 1280x1024. More and more widescreen are being sold with new systems or as upgrades to existing ones. Even in tough economic times, the tide cannot be turned back; screen resolution and size will continue to creep up. Using this resolution as a starting point, the maximum settings were applied to 3DMark Vantage include 8x Anti-Aliasing, 16x Anisotropic Filtering, all quality levels at Extreme, and Post Processing Scale at 1:2.

XFX_HD_5830_3DMark_Vantage_Jane_Nash_1680.jpg

Well, our first test looks promising! At 1680x1050 the Radeon HD 5830 slots in nicely between the HD 5770 and HD 5850. If anything, it leans towards the 5850 in this synthetic test. Also, notice that it just edges out a mildly overclocked GTX285. We'll have to keep an eye on that comparison as we move through our testing regimen. Wouldn't it be funny if that was the target performance level all along? Also, it's important to note that the HD 5830 results from this retail sample are absolutely consistent with the prototype card I tested earlier. Of course, it should be, but I feel better having tested it.

XFX_HD_5830_3DMark_Vantage_Jane_Nash_1920.jpg

At 1920x1200 resolution, things look much the same as they did at the lower screen size. The low end cards, with their limited 512MB of GDDR3 struggle to keep up, but everything else is the same. Let's take a look at test#2, which has a lot more surfaces to render, with all those asteroids flying around New Calico.

XFX_HD_5830_3DMark_Vantage_New_Calico_1680.jpg

In the New Calico test, the HD 5830 sits right in the center of the sweet spot between its siblings, the HD 5770 and HD 5850. So far, any concerns about the 50% reduction in ROPs seem unwarranted. The 5830 is keeping up with its big brother just fine.

XFX_HD_5830_3DMark_Vantage_New_Calico_1920.jpg

At a higher screen resolution of 1920x1200, we again see the 512MB cards falling behind, but the HD 5830 retains its spot halfway between the 5770 and 5850. It also barely tops the GTX285 again, so any complaints about the pricing on the HD 5830 need to consider the competition. We need to look at some actual gaming performance to verify these results, so let's take a look in the next section, at how these cards stack up in the standard bearer for gaming benchmarks, Crysis.

Product Series Stream Processors Core Clock (MHz) Shader Clock (MHz) Memory Clock (MHz) Memory Amount Memory Interface
MSI Radeon HD4830 (R4830 T2D512) 640 585 N/A 900 512MB GDDR3 256-bit
XFX Radeon HD5750 (HD-575X-ZNFC) 720 700 N/A 1150 1.0GB GDDR5 128-bit
ASUS Radeon HD4850 (EAH4850 TOP) 800 680 N/A 1050 512MB GDDR3 256-bit
ATI Radeon HD5770 (Engineering Sample) 800 850 N/A 1200 1.0GB GDDR5 128-bit
XFX Radeon HD5830 (HD-583X-ZNFV) 1120 800 N/A 1000 1.0GB GDDR5 256-bit
ASUS GeForce GTX 260 (ENGTX260 MATRIX) 216 576 1242 999 896MB GDDR3 448-bit
XFX Radeon HD5850 (21162-00-50R) 1440 725 N/A 1000 1.0GB GDDR5 256-bit
MSI GeForce GTX 275 (N275GTX Twin Frozr OC) 240 666 1476 1161 896MB GDDR3 448-bit
ASUS GeForce GTX 285 (GTX285 MATRIX) 240 662 1476 1242 1.0GB GDDR3 512-bit
XFX Radeon HD5870 (HD-587X-ZNFC) 1600 850 N/A 1200 1.0GB GDDR5 256-bit



 

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