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Written by Hank Tolman   
Monday, 29 March 2010
Table of Contents: Page Index
AMD Athlon-II X2-255 CPU ADX255OCGQBOX
Features and Specifications
Closer Look: Athlon-II X2-255
Testing and Results
EVEREST Benchmark Tests
Passmark PerformanceTest
PCMark Vantage Benchmark Tests
SiSoftware Sandra
Video Game Benchmarks
Final Thoughts and Conclusion

Athlon-II X2 AM3 Features

AMD Direct Connect Architecture

An award-winning technology designed to reduce bottlenecks that can exist when multiple components compete for access to the processor bus. Competing x86 systems use a single front-side bus (FSB) which must carry memory access, graphics, and I/O traffic. Eliminate the FSB, and you can reduce delays that competing access requests can cause.

45 nm Process Technology with Immersion Lithography

More efficient process technology with cutting-edge lithographic performance puts more transistors in less space.

AMD Wide Floating Point Accelerator

Doubles processor bandwidth from 64- to a full 128-Bit Floating-Point math processing pipeline that can double many of the bandwidth paths that help keep it full.

AMD Digital Media XPress 2.0 Technology

Provides support for SSE, SSE2, SSE3, SSE4a, and MMX instructions for digital media applications and security.

CPU Architectural Features

True Multi-Core Processing

The extensive AMD64 architectural optimizations and features enable thorough integration of multiple cores within the same processor, with each core having its own L1 and L2 caches.

AMD Dedicated Multi-Cache

Each core has its own dedicated L2 cache, which enables simultaneous independent core access to L2 cache, eliminating the need for cores to arbitrate for cache access. This helps reduce latency on L2 cache accesses.

AMD Virtualization (AMD-V) Technology

Silicon feature-set enhancements designed to improve the performance, reliability, and security of both existing and future virtualization environments.

AMD PowerNow! 3.0 Technology

The latest power management technologies that deliver performance on demand when you need it, and power savings when you don't.

HyperTransport 3.0 Technology

Third-generation HyperTransportTM interface improves performance, supporting transfer speeds up to 4.4GT/s.

Simultaneous 32-bit and 64-bit Computing

AMD64 technology enables a breakthrough approach to 64-bit computing that doubles the number of registers in the processor and allows PC users to use today's 32-bit software applications while enabling them to also use the next generation of 64-bit applications.

Cool'n'Quiet 3.0 Technology

Up to eight different performance states help enhance power efficiency. Simplified performance state transitions can reduce latency and the software overhead of performance state changes.

AMD Dynamic Power Management

Each processor core, and the integrated memory controller and HyperTransportTM controller, is powered by dedicated voltage planes.

Integrated Dual-Channel Memory Controller

Directly connects the processor to memory for optimum performance, low latency, and high throughput.

Multi-Point Thermal Control

The next-generation design features multiple on-die thermal sensors with digital interface. Automatic reduction of p-state when temperature exceeds pre-defined limit. Additional memory thermal management interface.

AMD CoolCore Technology

Coarse and fine transistor control that can automatically reduce processor energy consumption by turning off unused parts of the processor.

ADX255OGQBOX Specificationsathlon_II_x2_250_logo.jpg

  • Model Number & Core Frequency: X2 255 = 3.1GHz
  • TRAY OPN# ADX255OCK23GQ
  • PIB OPN# ADX255OGQBOX
  • L1 Cache Sizes: 64K of L1 instruction and 64K of L1 data cache per core (256KB total L1 per processor)
  • L2 Cache Sizes: 1MB of L2 data cache per core (2MB total L2 per processor)
  • Memory Controller Type: Integrated 128-bit wide memory controller *
  • Memory Controller Speed: 2.0GHz with Dual Dynamic Power Management
  • Types of Memory Supported: Support for unregistered DIMMs up to DDR2-1066MHz -AND- DDR3-1333MHz
  • HyperTransport 3.0 Specification: One 16-bit/16-bit link @ up to 4.0GHz full duplex (2.0GHz x2)
  • Total Processor-to-System Bandwidth: Up to 33.1GB/s bandwidth [Up to 17.1 GB/s total bandwidth (DDR3-1066) + 16.0GB/s (HT3)]
  • Up to 28.8GB/s bandwidth [Up to 12.8 GB/s total bandwidth (DDR2-800) + 16.0GB/s (HT3)]
  • Packaging: Socket AM3 938-pin organic micro pin grid array (micro-PGA)
  • Fab location: GLOBALFOUNDRIES Fab 1 Module 1
  • Process Technology: 45-nanometer DSL SOI (silicon-on-insulator) technology
  • Approximate Die Size: 117.5 mm2
  • Approximate Transistor count: ~ 234 million
  • Max Temp: 74 Celsius
  • Core Voltage: 0.85-1.425V
  • Max TDP: 65 Watts
  • MSRP: $74.99

*Note: configurable for dual 64-bit channels for simultaneous read/writes



 

Comments 

 
# Great read with one flawBrian 2010-03-30 06:41
I like the read. It had great set of info for my next build, but I see a small flaw in the test. You said in the description that the FSB was eliminated because then the data transfer will be a whole lot faster than with a FSB, but I would like to know since the E6300 FSB is 1066Mhz, and the E5300 FSB is 800Mhz, what would happen with the Intel processor with a FSB of 1333MHz? The tests are sound don't get me wrong, but I would like to see what will the outcome will be with this processor. I use both AMD and Intel at home, and I see a great difference between them. but I would like to know more when it comes with a higher FSB? Still a great read, a job well done.
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# Contributing EditorHank 2010-03-30 07:40
I'm sorry, but I am extremely confused by your comment. I don't know how it would be possible to eliminate the FSB. Also, if I were to use an Intel processor with an FSB of 1333MHz it would certainly be faster than the Athlon-II X2-255, considering the least expensive of these would be a Core 2 Quad at about $160 or so. We don't need benchmarks to tell us that the Core 2 Quad will come out ahead. If I'm way off and you are talking about something else altogether, could you rephrase you question for me?
Hope this helps,

Hank
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# RE: Contributing EditorBrian 2010-03-30 08:09
Thanks for the reply, to rephrase the question, there are dual core processors that have a FSB of 1333Mhz, i.e Intel E8500. Since this is just a dual core processor, how will something like the E8500 or the E6750 go against the Athlon II X2 which has no FSB?
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# RE: RE: Contributing EditorHank 2010-03-30 09:41
Ok, I see what you mean. The processors with a 1333MHz FSB would likely all outperform the Athlon-II X2-255. The increase FSB speed would make a difference, but so would the 4MB of L2 cache. The processors used in this review were picked to test the upgradeability of the Athlon-II X2-255, and also to show its performance relative to its price. Even the E6750 will run you nearly twice what the Athlon-II X2-255, so you can expect that it will do better. But will it do twice as well as the X2-255? It's all about what you are willing to spend, as well. Paired with a 785G motherboard, like in the review, the processor/mb combo is only $150. You would be spending that on just the processor for a 1333MHz Core 2 Duo, and you wouldn't get the Radeon HD 4200. :)
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# RE: RE: Contributing EditorHank 2010-03-30 09:50
I don't there is an Intel competitor that can match the performance of the X2-255 for the same price. I think to get a processor that will beat the X2-255, you need to look at the Pentium E6500, and even that might be close. The Core 2 Duos, even the E7500 at just over $100 will outperform the X2-255, and certainly the i3-530 at $120. You'd have to compare those, however, to the Phenom-II X2-555 or maybe the Athlon-II X4-630 to get a better idea of AMD/Intel matchup.
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# RE: RE: Contributing EditorBrian 2010-03-30 14:55
Well if you put it that way than that's actually more understandable, I was just wondering why the 1333Mhz dual core processor was not on the list for some reason. But thanks for the replies, it was still a very informative reading. :)
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# RE: AMD Athlon-II X2-255 CPU ADX255OCGQBOXJohn D mathis 2011-02-04 19:24
Intersting read, informative, factual, and utilitarian. I am contemplating an upgrade on my Velocity Micro lemon, w/Intel mobo, E6600 CpU, andhaving replaced the Mobo, video card, snd card, re-installed XP Home, several times over the three years, I look longingly at the AMD line in an Asus Mobo. It appears that AMD-Asus kit would be the way to go, based on the near 20 years my Compaq (AMD cpu) has lasted w/o a hitch.Caveat other than the Creative Snd Card, always a problem configuring. Couple that with not having to replace snd, video and Net card and the value goes way up. Doing the owrk myself, a no brainer with today's modular designs, makes the AMD a GREATER value. Bit more inot the Mobo, and still save about 50% over Intel's inflated prices and w/o the arrogance of their deaf "help desk". You guys are great, saved me a tone of money, aguish and KEEP up the good work.
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