Archive Home arrow Reviews: arrow Storage arrow G2 Kingston SSDNowV+ Series SSD SNVP325
G2 Kingston SSDNowV+ Series SSD SNVP325 E-mail
Reviews - Featured Reviews: Storage
Written by Olin Coles   
Monday, 25 January 2010
Table of Contents: Page Index
G2 Kingston SSDNowV+ Series SSD SNVP325
Features and Specifications
First Look: Kingston SSDNow V
Toshiba T6UG1XBG SSD Controller
SSD Testing Methodology
ATTO Disk Benchmark
HD Tune Pro Benchmarks
Iometer IOPS Performance
EVEREST Disk Benchmark
CrystalDiskMark Tests
SSD vs Hard Disk Drive
Kingston SSDNow V G2 Conclusion

Kingston SSDNowV+ SNVP325 Review

Solid State Drive (SSD) technology is developed for two groups of users: large-scale Enterprise environments and individual end-users. Kingston Technology has been in the business of satisfying enthusiasts and gamers for many years, and their SSDNow series of NAND-flash storage products has been the affordable solution for system upgrades. In this article, Benchmark Reviews introduces the second-generation Kingston SSDNowV+ Solid State Drive series. Based on the high-performance Toshiba T6UG1XBG processor, the Kingston SSDNowV+ SNVP325-S2 delivers native TRIM support with a maximum rated read speed of 230MBps and write-to bandwidth peaking at 180MBps.

For over twelve years Kingston has sold system memory upgrade kits to help boost personal computer performance. Installing RAM system memory is a simple process, and it generally speeds-up an old PC. Yet, because the processor and memory both operate at level much faster than the average hard disk, the real bottleneck is the computer's primary drive. Solid State Drives are the ideal upgrade for hard drive users wanting dramatic performance improvements, and the difference an SSD makes is far noticeable than any memory upgrade.

Up until recently, Solid State Drive popularity was only growing inside elite enthusiast circles. Value is how Kingston markets their entire SSDNow-V series. Knowing that price was the biggest challenge, Kingston did an outstanding job of making SSD technology affordable for the masses with their SSDNow-V 40GB Boot Drive SNV125-S2/40GB upgrade kit, a product that sells for only $129.99. Even the Kingston SSDNow V+ SNV225 series, which were all based on the Samsung S3C29RBB01-YK40 controller, offered a 64GB version for $185. Not known for offering the status quo, Kingston has returned with a second-generation technology for the new SSDNow V+ SNVP325 models built around the Toshiba T6UG1XBG controller.

Kingston_SNVP325-S2B-128GB_Upgrade_Kit.jpg

Just over two years ago there were only five companies involved in Solid State Drive technology, and as of January 2010 there are nearly 140 names in the business. Without doubt, the SSD market has enjoyed a powerful growth period with relatively painless consumer acceptance. Benchmark Reviews has been on top of the SSD scene since retail products were first introduced at the 2008 Consumer Electronics Show

In such a short amount of time, the entire SSD market has created and recreated itself several times over. Counting the generations of SSD processors has become difficult for experienced experts, and keeping-up with controller architecture has come with its own set of challenges. Benchmark Reviews has already tested dozens of Solid State Drive products, and we've seen everything from dual-SATA controllers in RAID-0 to large cache buffer modules used inside of them. In this article Benchmark Reviews inspects the Toshiba T6UG1XBG Solid State Drive controller, which is used in the second-generation Kingston SSDNow V+ SNVP325 (which replaces the older SNV225 series with Samsung controller).

While the SSD industry grows daily, only a few select manufacturers offer popularly-accepted Flash NAND SSD controllers. The most popular consumer controllers at the moment are: Indilinx IDX110M00-FC "Barefoot", Intel PC29AS21AA0, JMicron JMF612, Toshiba T6UG1XBG, Samsung S3C29RBB01-YK40, Marvell 88SS8014-BHP2, and SandForce SF-1200/1500.

SSD Testing Disclaimer

Early on in our SSD coverage, Benchmark Reviews published an article which detailed Solid State Drive Benchmark Performance Testing. The research and discussion that went into producing that article changed the way we now test SSD products. Our previous perceptions of this technology were lost on one particular difference: the wear leveling algorithm that makes data a moving target. Without conclusive linear bandwidth testing or some other method of total-capacity testing, our previous performance results were rough estimates at best.

Our test results were obtained after each SSD had been prepared using DISKPART or Sanitary Erase tools. As a word of caution, applications such as these offer immediate but temporary restoration of original 'pristine' performance levels. In our tests, we discovered that the maximum performance results (charted) would decay as subsequent tests were performed. SSDs attached to TRIM enabled Operating Systems will benefit from continuously refreshed performance, whereas older O/S's will require a garbage collection (GC) tool to avoid 'dirty NAND' performance degradation.

It's critically important to understand that no software for the Microsoft Windows platform can accurately measure SSD performance in a comparable fashion. Synthetic benchmark tools such as HD Tach and PCMark are helpful indicators, but should not be considered the ultimate determining factor. That factor should be measured in actual user experience of real-world applications. Benchmark Reviews includes both bandwidth benchmarks and application speed tests to present a conclusive measurement of product performance.

About Kingston Digital, Inc.

Kingston Digital, Inc. ("KDI") is the Flash memory affiliate of Kingston Technology Company, Inc., the world's largest independent manufacturer of memory products. Established in 2008, KDI is headquartered in Fountain Valley, California, USA. For more information, please visit http://www.kingston.com/ or call 800-337-8410.

About Kingston Technology Company, Inc.

Kingston Technology Company, Inc. is the world's largest independent manufacturer of memory products. Kingston designs, manufactures and distributes memory products for desktops, laptops, servers, printers, and Flash memory products for PDAs, mobile phones, digital cameras, and MP3 players. Through its global network of subsidiaries and affiliates, Kingston has manufacturing facilities in California, Malaysia, Taiwan, China and sales representatives in the United States, Europe, Russia, Australia, New Zealand, India, Taiwan, China, and Latin America. kingston_logo_tag_600px.png

Founded in 1987 with a single product offering, Kingston now offers more than 2,000 memory products that support nearly every device that uses memory, from computers, servers and printers to MP3 players, digital cameras and cell phones. In 2006, the company's sales exceeded $3.7 billion.

With global headquarters in Fountain Valley, California, Kingston employs more than 3,300 people worldwide. Regarded as one of the "Best Companies to Work for in America" by Fortune magazine, Kingston's tenets of respect, loyalty, flexibility and integrity create an exemplary corporate culture. Kingston believes that investing in its people is essential, and each employee is a vital part of Kingston's success.

Kingston serves an international network of distributors, resellers, retailers and OEM customers on six continents. The company also provides contract manufacturing and supply chain management services for semiconductor manufacturers and system OEMs.

At the Forefront of Memory: The History of Kingston

Kingston Technology grew out of a severe shortage of surface-mount memory chips in the high-tech marketplace in the 1980s. John Tu and David Sun were determined to find a solution. They put their engineering expertise to work and designed a new Single In-Line Memory Module (SIMM) that used readily available, older technology through-hole components. A new industry standard was born - and, on October 17, 1987, so was Kingston Technology.



 

Comments have been disabled by the administrator.

Search Benchmark Reviews
QNAP Network Storage Servers

Follow Benchmark Reviews on FacebookReceive Tweets from Benchmark Reviews on Twitter