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Written by Hank Tolman   
Sunday, 22 November 2009
Table of Contents: Page Index
NZXT Gamma Computer Case GAMA-001BK
Closer Look: Exterior
Detailed Exterior Features
Closer Look: Interior
Detailed Interior Features
Final Thoughts and Conclusion

Detailed Exterior Features

The front panel of the NZXT Gamma Mid-Tower Computer Case is a sight to behold. It's not flashy and extra-terrestrial looking, but at the same time its angular curves hold quite an appeal. The 5.25" drive bay covers are all filtered and meshed, as is the bottom of the front panel. Is anyone else noticing a distinct positive air-flow theme here? The Gamma does away with some of the LED lit trimming that is pretty common on classic NZXT cases. There is still a blue LED strip under the reset button and in the center, under the drive bays, that excentuate the simple and elegant design of the case. It no doubt helps with keeping the cost low as well.

NZXT_Gamma_Front_Right.jpg

Inside the front panel is a mount for a 140mm fan. You have to take off the front faceplate to get to it, so I would recommend putting it in before you start tucking away all the excess cabling you have. It is a great location for an air-input fan, especially with the filter on the faceplate. One of the things that always gets to me is opening my computer case just to see that it is full of dust. The Gamma has obviously taken this into consideration and placed filters in strategic locations of mass air input throughout the case.

NZXT_Gamma_Front_Fan.jpg

Let's talk a little more about the external ports on the front face plate. The NZXT Gamma supplies you with the two USB ports and audio ports for headphones and a microphone. This is pretty standard now, and most cases will have these ports on them. What a lot of cases won't have is an ESATA port on the front panel. The NZXT Gamma does not disappoint here and follows the tradition of cases normally priced much higher by supporting this option. While ESATA still isn't nearly as widely used as USB, it is rapidly becoming a more viable option. The fact that NZXT would add this feature to a very inexpensive case shows that, while they are willing to drop frills to save on costs, they won't skimp on features for their costumers.

NZXT_Gamma_Ext_Ports.jpg

If you flip the Gamma over and take a look at the bottom of the case, you will find a couple of interesting things. The feet on the Gamma are just a little bit bigger than on most other cases I have worked with. This makes the Gamma somewhat taller than other mid-tower cases. There is a purpose behind this madness however. As I mentioned before, the Gamma slots the power supply at the bottom of the case, and as many power supplies have a fan on the bottom, this poses a dilemma. NZXT didn't see it as a problem, though. The Gamma sports a mesh opening for the power supply bottom fan complete with a, yup, you guessed it, filter. Sitting the case a little higher off the ground now makes perfect sense, as it gives the fan quite a bit of increase airflow to pull from while cooling the power supply. I mention this here while discussing detailed exterior features because the filter is on the outside of the case. It is easily removable for cleaning. I must say I am quite impressed by this little, but very thoughtful, feature.

NZXT_Gamma_Bottom_Fan.jpg

Even from just looking at the exterior of the case, it is clear that NZXT had the customer in mind when creating the Gamma. This isn't an attempt at making a cheap case to sell to the masses for a big profit. A lot of thought went into the Gamma, as we have seen from the massive amounts of cooling area, the layout of the case, and even the option for water cooling built directly into the case. As we delve into the interior of the Gamma, you will see that this same foresight was applied inside as well as out.



 

Comments 

 
# Mr.Sameh Abdel Qawy 2012-04-14 17:31
Hello,

Is there a software to test my power supply wattage? I have a Gamma power supply and its wattage is 300W printed on its label but I need to be sure about it by using a software. Is there a way to do that?
Thank you a lot.

Regards,
Sameh Abdel Qawy
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