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Microsoft Windows 7 Upgrade and Installation E-mail
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Written by Nate Swetland - Edited by Olin Coles   
Tuesday, 10 November 2009
Table of Contents: Page Index
Microsoft Windows 7 Upgrade and Installation
Best Practice: Clean Install
Clean Upgrade Installation
Custom Upgrade: Previous OS Bypass
Custom Upgrade: OS Bypass Continued
Windows 7 Final Thoughts

Best Practice: Clean Install

A clean install is a install method where you completely wipe the previous operating system and start over from scratch. There are a couple reasons why you would want to do this: The first reason is that you purchased a built or purchased new machine with no operating system, and want to get it up and running. Another reason for a clean install is if you want to just get rid of all your trash and start fresh. A third reason for a clean install would be if you currently use Windows XP/2000/Me/98.

Microsoft_Windows-7_Install_12.jpg

Two of the choices you have for purchase for a clean install is the Retail and OEM version. OEM is a one-time shot, where you install it on one machine, and it stays with that machine and cannot be transferred to a new machine or another person. Retail is the version where you can install it as many times as you like, but can only have one copy activated on one machine at any given time. OEM is more expensive than an upgrade, but not as expensive as Retail. You can upgrade with an OEM or Retail disk, but it would be silly to spend the extra money for a standalone version if you were just going to do an upgrade. Unless you later plan on wiping the system and don't want to go through the trouble of installing the previous OS, and then Windows 7. There is a way around that, but we will discuss that later.

Microsoft_Windows-7_Install_1.jpg

Here is what the first step of Windows 7 Professional installation looks like.

Microsoft_Windows-7_Install_2.jpg

This is the screen where you decide whether you want to do an upgrade, or a custom install. If you want a clean install, you would choose custom.

EDITOR'S NOTE: At the time of this writing, NewEgg offered the following Microsoft Windows 7 Operating System choices for clean installation:

  • OEM Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium for System Builders: 64-bit $106.99 or 32-bit $106.99
  • OEM Microsoft Windows 7 Professional for System Builders: 64-bit $139.99 or 32-bit $139.99
  • OEM Microsoft Windows 7 Ultimate for System Builders: 64-bit $174.99 or 32-bit $174.99
  • Retail Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium (includes both 32- or 64-bit DVDs) $188.99
  • Retail Microsoft Windows 7 Professional (includes both 32- or 64-bit DVDs) $281.99
  • Retail Microsoft Windows 7 Ultimate (includes both 32- or 64-bit DVDs) $291.99



 

Comments 

 
# Can we install to USBRob 2011-02-17 12:31
On Page: #benchmarkreviews.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=579&Itemid=60&limit=1&limitstart=2 it says: "This is where you pick which drive you want to install windows to."

If we buy a Netbook with "Windows 7 Starter" and upgrade to 'something' (useful) can we choose to install the Windows 7 Upgrade to an external USB Key ?

Then we could empty the Netbook's internal Drive and Install Debian Linux. If we ever wanted to run the upgraded Windows 7 we could boot from the USB key otherwise we would just use our Netbook as a Linux Machine.

Rob
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# RE: Can we install to USBOlin Coles 2011-02-17 12:40
As I understand it, Windows 7 will not allow you to install onto removable media.
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# RE: Can we install to USBRob 2011-02-17 23:14
Grrrr. Crippleware "Windows 7 Starter" and can't install to a removable Drive on a Netbook (where you might want to do so the most). That only encourages me to install Linux even more. It will be faster and cheaper.

This is what I have been looking at, an AMD C-50 (with 6250 Graphics) in a Netbook for $300:
#support.acer.com/acerpanam/netbook/2011/Acer/Aspire/AspireOneAO522/AspireOneAO522sp2.shtml


I guess we could just install to the internal Drive (do what MS wants), image it (see below), wipe it (easy), then USB install Debian.

#benchmarkreviews.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=439&Itemid=38&limit=1&limitstart=2

Thanks for your answer.
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