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Btrfs Is Not Yet The Performance King E-mail
Written by Phoronix   
Thursday, 30 April 2009

With the release this week of Fedora 11 Preview, which incorporates install-time support for the Btrfs file-system into Red Hat's Anaconda installer, we have now delivered our first set of benchmark results for this next-generation Linux file-system. Through a horde of disk tests we have looked at the Btrfs file-system performance and compared it to that of EXT3, EXT4, and XFS. While Btrfs does perform well in some areas, it is not yet the performance king for Linux file-systems. As our results show, in some tests it even has a hard time competing with the incremental EXT4 file-system.

While we have talked about the Btrfs file-system before, as a quick primer it was originally developed by Chris Mason at Oracle and was merged into the mainline kernel with Linux 2.6.29. Though present in the mainline kernel, the Btrfs file-system is still undergoing heavy development and its disk format has yet to be finalized. The Btrfs file-system supports writable snapshots, sub-volumes, object-level mirroring and stripping, data checksums, compression, online file-system checking support, and online defragmentation support. With solid-state drives also becoming increasingly common, there is also a SSD-optimized mode for Btrfs that should increase performance. Btrfs is considered a technological step-up from the EXT4 file-system and a competitor to Sun's ZFS file-system, which soon may actually be owned by Oracle. Phoronix


 

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