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240GB OCZ Vertex 3.20 Solid State Drive E-mail
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Written by Olin Coles   
Wednesday, 17 April 2013
Table of Contents: Page Index
240GB OCZ Vertex 3.20 Solid State Drive
OCZ Vertex 3.20 SSD
Features and Specifications
SSD Testing Methodology
AS-SSD Benchmark
ATTO Disk Benchmark
CrystalDiskMark 3.0 Tests
Iometer IOPS Performance
EVEREST Disk Benchmark
PCMark Vantage HDD Tests
OCZ Vertex 3.20 Conclusion

Closer Look: OCZ Vertex 3.20 SSD

Solid state drive devices have gained quick popularity with performance-minded consumers because they work equally well in PC, Linux, or Apple computer systems. Likewise, these drives install quite easily into both desktop and notebook platforms without modification. The OCZ Vertex 3.20 SSD Series is best suited for performance-orientated users, giving personal computers a much faster response time and boosting productivity.

In this article Benchmark Reviews will test the 240GB OCZ Vertex 3.20 SSD series, which comes packaged in a plastic clamshell container. OCZ Technology offers the Vertex 3.20 SSD series in only two capacities: 120 GB and 240 GB. These models share the same part numbers with a capacity designator: VTX3-25SAT3-240G.20 that represents the 240 GB model. All OCZ Vertex 3.20 solid state drive products measure 99.8 L x 69.63 W x 9.3mm H. The 120GB version is available for $119.99 (Newegg/Amazon), and 240GB capacity for $229.99 (Newegg/Amazon).

OCZ-Vertex-3.20-120GB-Solid-State-Drive-Package.jpg

The 240GB model we received (VTX3-25SAT3-240G.20) is specified to reach 550 MB/s for sequential reads and 520 MB/s sequential writes. OCZ specifies 4K random reads up to 35,000 IOPS and random writes up to 65,000 IOPS. Although Vertex 3.20's product specification advertise extremely fast performance ratings, these solid state drive products are designed with a focus on product reliability. The SandForce SF-2281 controller and firmware inside Vertex 3.20 SSDs receive a long validation cycle to ensure optimal stability is delivered to the consumer, and receive an OCZ Technology three-year product warranty. These features could help factor into the consumer's decision, as it improves long-term value.

Unlike fragile Hard Disk Drive (HDD) storage products, SSDs are not nearly as sensitive to impact damage and do not require (or benefit from) any kind of special vibration dampening or shock-proof enclosures. Once installed the SSD is usually hidden away from view, which explains why OCZ has maintained a conservative appearance on the Vertex 3.20 series.

OCZ-Vertex-3.20-120GB-Solid-State-Drive-Tilt.jpg

The OCZ Vertex 3.20 SSD features a 9.3mm thick chassis that comes painted black finish. OCZ utilizes a standard two-piece metal enclosure for Vertex 3.20-series SSDs, with a series branding label at the top panel and product information label on the bottom. Internal components are revealed by removing four small counter-sunk screws located at the bottom of this solid state drive.

Standard 2.5" drive bay mounting points are pre-drilled into the SSD chassis with fine screw threading, allowing this drive to fit directly into notebook computers that use SATA connections. The SSD mounting positions matched up to the drive bracket on my notebook computer, and after only a few minutes of upgrading I booted-up from a restored Windows 7 System Backup Image with ease. Optionally, by using the included 3.5" to 2.5" tray adapter this SSD will also install directly into ATX desktop computers.

Backwards compatible with SATA 1.5 GB/s and 3.0 GB/s interfaces, all LSI/SandForce SSD controllers offer: native TRIM garbage collection in supporting Operating System (such as Microsoft Windows-7), Native Command Queuing (NCQ) with 32 command slots, and basic Self-Monitoring, Analysis, and Reporting Technology (SMART) command set. LSI/SandForce built the SF-2200 series to produce 500 MB/s sequential read and write bandwidth with 60K (burst)/20K (sustained) IOPS random write (4K transfers). More detail is available in our LSI/SandForce SF-2000 Series SSD Processor Overview article.

OCZ-Vertex-3.20-120GB-Solid-State-Drive-Angle.jpg

Similar to other second-generation LSI/SandForce-driven SSDs, OCZ Vertex 3.20-series SSDs feature a SF-2281VB1-SDC SATA 6Gb/s processor. Offering 8 flash channels with 8 Byte lanes configured (one lane per channel), the SF-2281 maintains a BGA-256 package. The SF-2281 controller offers advanced ECC engine correcting up to 55 bits per 512-byte sector to assure high data integrity and support for future generations of flash memory.

The SF-2281 SSD processor provides enhanced ECC with BCH data protection, and also includes LSI/SandForce's unique RAISE (Redundant Array of Independent Silicon Elements) technology. RAISE provides the protection and reliability of RAID on a single SSD drive, thanks to flash architecture, without the significant write overhead of parity. The LSI/SandForce DuraClass technology automatically stores data using Trusted Computing Group (TCG) OPAL security with 256-bit AES encryption and automatic, line-rate double encryption with a drive-level password, preventing data extraction directly from the physical flash memory modules.

In the next few sections we'll test the OCZ Vertex 3.20 solid state drive, comparing this solid state drive to other retail products intended for notebook and desktop installations.



 

Comments 

 
# RE: 240GB OCZ Vertex 3.20 Solid State Drivekzinti1 2013-05-27 22:56
There was an article not too long ago that OCZ was going out of business.
Are they or not? They keep coming out with new products so apparently not.
I'd forward the article but now I can't find it.
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# RE: RE: 240GB OCZ Vertex 3.20 Solid State DriveOlin Coles 2013-05-28 07:02
You can't find it because we never wrote that OCZ was going out of business. We did write about their layoffs and stock value about seven months ago:
benchmarkreviews.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=20789
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# RE: RE: RE: 240GB OCZ Vertex 3.20 Solid State Drivekzinti1 2013-05-28 07:25
I never mentioned that it was you that wrote the article. Never!
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# RE: 240GB OCZ Vertex 3.20 Solid State DriveMugsy 2013-05-28 06:02
I'm most impressed by the benchmark results for the Vertex 4, which are consistently at or near the top of every test, and well above the 3.20.

I'm disappointed not to see any RAID configurations thrown into the mix (most notably, how a Raid-0 of the 120 compares to a single 240.)
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# RE: RE: 240GB OCZ Vertex 3.20 Solid State DriveOlin Coles 2013-05-28 07:04
Almost nobody purchases a SSD to put it into a RAID-0 array, so obtaining a second drive for the sake of pleasing 1/10000 of the readers wouldn't make a lot of sense.
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# RE: RE: RE: 240GB OCZ Vertex 3.20 Solid State DriveMugsy 2013-05-28 07:35
Begging your pardon, but that's a pretty stupid reply.

With a 120GB SSD running at almost exactly have the price as it's 240GB older brother, the possible performance increase over running two 120's over two SATA-III ports vs running a single 240 over just one SATA-III port, seems a bit near-sided.
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# lalamoeb 2013-05-28 07:44
as far as i know in raid-0-mode trim and other vital features do not work
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# Trim, RAID 0, Z77Bruce 2013-05-28 08:50
The Z77 Intel Chipset supports Trim with RAID. It's a shame that it only supports two SATA 6Gb/s ports, limiting RAID options to RAID 0 or RAID 1.
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# RE: RE: RE: RE: 240GB OCZ Vertex 3.20 Solid State Drivekzinti1 2013-05-28 08:01
You do know that the only storage capacity running a pair of 120GB ssd's in RAID-0 is 120GB don't you?
You only obtain a faster speed and still have only the capacity of one 120GB ssd. The designation "240 GB's" is meaningless when describing this.
Paying twice just for a bump in speed is what's completely stupid.
If you lose one drive then you lose the info on both drives in RAID-0.
RAID-0 is just fine for hdd's to get a worthwhile gain in speed.
For SSD's the speed increase is not worth the expense. Just a complete waste of money.
I use 500 GB Samsung SSD's and don't RAID them. They're more than fast enough as is and running a pair in RAID-0 would just be ludicrous.
I own 5 of these, so far, that cost $319.99 each. I am more than happy with their speed as is.
If it were possible, all I would do is run them as JBOD. Same speed but double capacity.
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# RAID-0Mugsy 2013-05-28 08:45
Raid-0 is not redundant. It is simple "striping", so you will have all 240GB available. (only Raid levels above 0 that allocate one drive just for recovery "wastes" a drive.)

I'm not sure what you're talking about. But then again, neither do you.

The pitfalls of using Raid-0 (lose one drive and lose everything) is the same whether you use SSDs or HDDs. I ran Raid-0 with two HDDs for years with no problem. SSDs are (no longer) more susceptible to failure than most HDDs.

You claim Raiding SSDs is "not worth the expense", but with two 120GB going for $240 and a single 240GB going for $220, the "expense" is only $20 whereas the performance gains might more than justify the extra money (but we don't know b/c they never tested it.)

Whether YOU are satisfied with the speed of your single SSDs is a matter of usage and personal preference. *I* however edit LARGE A/V files frequently that would greatly benefit from the faster Read/Write speeds of Raid-0.
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