Archive Home arrow Reviews: arrow Storage arrow 4TB Seagate Desktop HDD ST4000DM000
4TB Seagate Desktop HDD ST4000DM000 E-mail
Reviews - Featured Reviews: Storage
Written by Olin Coles   
Monday, 15 April 2013
Table of Contents: Page Index
4TB Seagate Desktop HDD ST4000DM000
Drive Testing Methodology
AS-SSD Benchmark
ATTO Disk Benchmark
CrystalDiskMark 3.0 Tests
Iometer IOPS Performance
PCMark Vantage HDD Tests
Desktop Storage Final Thoughts
Seagate Desktop HDD Conclusion

Seagate Desktop HDD Conclusion

IMPORTANT: Although the rating and final score mentioned in this conclusion are made to be as objective as possible, please be advised that every author perceives these factors differently at various points in time. While we each do our best to ensure that all aspects of the product are considered, there are often times unforeseen market conditions and manufacturer changes which occur after publication that could render our rating obsolete. Please do not base any purchase solely on our conclusion, as it represents our product rating specifically for the product tested which may differ from future versions. Benchmark Reviews begins our conclusion with a short summary for each of the areas that we rate.

Beginning with performance, the 4TB Seagate Desktop HDD (model ST4000DM000) is a high-capacity 5900 RPM hard disk drive that competes for shelf space against several other modern mechanical storage devices. While this 4TB Seagate Desktop HDD provided worthwhile transfer speeds, its slow rotational speed held it back. On the matter of spindle speeds, it seemed deliberate that this particular specification was absent from all Seagate product materials - including their product technical white papers. In any event, the large 625Gb/in2 areal density across four 1GB disc platters delivered 145 MB/s transfer speeds ideal for archive file storage. Seagate's Desktop HDD series is great for systems requiring top-end storage space, such as NAS servers or backup enclosures, while still working fast enough as the standalone drive in computer systems.

Into their 15th generation of hard disk drive products, Seagate's Desktop HDD series offers consumers a two-year limited product warranty. This is an unfortunate departure from their previously offered 5-year warranty for all Barracuda XT drives, but has been the standard since their last-generation Barracuda debut. The drive's low operating temperature and power saving rotational shut-down features may possibly make long-term warranties a moot point, but that would also be reason to stand behind the technology.

Seagate delivers industry-leading quality and construction in all of their products, and the high-capacity Seagate Desktop HDD series is their end-result after years of proven industry experience. Since spinning mechanical storage technology is so mature, especially from a company like Seagate, there are no issues with hardware compatibility or firmware functionality - UEFI-based systems can utilize all 4TB right out of the box.

Available as a bare-drive OEM kit (ST4000DM000) or retail boxed kit (STBD4000400), as of April 2013 the Seagate Desktop HDD is available online for $189 (OEM: Amazon|Newegg) or $199 (Retail: Amazon|Newegg). An excellent value for high-capacity storage, the Seagate Desktop HDD costs only 4.7 cents per gigabyte.

Based on the current condition of today's desktop storage market, it's still very much a hard drive friendly world. While SSD technology will eventually replace hard disk storage one day soon, there's no evidence as to when solid state storage can match capacity at the same price point. The 4TB Seagate Desktop HDD resists that forthcoming change, and its massive four-terabyte capacity paired to the future-proof SATA 6Gb/s interface will certainly help punctuate this. The affordable cost to capacity ratio puts the Desktop HDD series ahead of SSDs, while still offering respectable bandwidth performance speeds for modern computer systems.

Pros:Benchmark Reviews Seal of Approval

+ Very good 146 MB/s data transfer speeds
+ 3rd-generation SATA 6Gb/s compliant controller
+ Massive 4-Terabyte storage capacity across four platters
+ 64MB Cache buffer improves burst transactions
+ Low-power standby conserves energy
+ 2-Year Seagate product warranty
+ UEFI Systems can utilize all 4TB out of the box

Cons:

- 5900 RPM rotational speeds offer lower performance
- 2.1TB Barrier not removed via native hardware instruction on older O/S's
- Previous Barracuda XT series offered 5-year warranty

Ratings:

  • Performance: 8.75
  • Appearance: 8.50
  • Construction: 9.25
  • Functionality: 9.00
  • Value: 8.00

Final Score: 8.7 out of 10.

Recommended: Benchmark Reviews Seal of Approval.

COMMENT QUESTION: Does it bother you that the 4TB Seagate Desktop HDD is a 5900 RPM hard drive?

NewEgg.com


Related Articles:


 

Comments 

 
# To update or not?HTWingNut 2013-05-22 15:51
I have a WHS 2011 with three 3TB Seagate Barracuda drives and two 2TB drives. I'm tempted to go with four 4TB drives, but that hit in performance is troubling. Although in reality I don't think I'll notice. Just wish it were 7200RPM and I wouldn't think twice. Can't believe there's no more comments, but thanks for the thorough review and comparison with 3TB drives!
Report Comment
 
 
# RE: To update or not?Athlonite 2013-05-24 19:24
Honestly there is no real difference between this HDD and the 7200rpm WD 4TB HDD there's maybe 1~3% and it was a toss up between the two for most tests
Report Comment
 
 
# Is 5900 RPM a show stopper?David Lean 2013-05-24 02:32
"Does it bother you that the 4TB Seagate Desktop HDD is a 5900 RPM hard drive?"
For what I want Yes, I'd have preferred 7,200. So am likely to look at other drives.

However if I was building an Online backup or Media store, then this drives might even be preferable. But 5,900 RPM typically means less heat & less power. The Perf drop is not that much, ~10%. So these would be fine as a target for backups or media (movies & music).
OR
they could also be balanced by SSD Drives. So you'd put your IO Intensive apps on the SSD & have them write their log files, diagnostic & audit output to these 4TB drives.
Report Comment
 
 
# clickalfie 2013-05-24 05:49
"power saving rotational shut-down"

I hope this and the low spindle speed solves the problem with seagate drives clicking due to APM.

nice article as ever Olin Coles.
Report Comment
 
 
# You Have No Idea How High-end This HDD Is!Luay 2013-05-27 00:14
If you don't have or plan on having a 256++GB SSD, go get your performance oriented, loud and power-consuming HDD! And upload your Windows XP and "Ace Of Base" albums while you're at it!

This HDD caters to the modern user. 4x 1TB platters seals the deal even more. Pair this with a 960GB Crucial M5 if you can and sleep on it.

2 year warranty is also a logical and acceptable compromise, as long as you are using this HDD for what it is supposed to be used for, non-intensive, non-exe files. The stress and speed of executing files, writing, reading becomes irrelevant.

If I have to find a negative, it would be when I install this HDD and shift my file library to it. That's probably going to take a longer time but it's a one-time thing.
Report Comment
 
 
# What?David Lean 2013-05-27 01:50
@Luay
Not sure where your head is at &/or who you are trying to abuse.
But I expect many are professional IT folks who read these reviews. They want more than a 2 disk home gaming system.
eg: Developers running very large virtual machines, perhaps with huge databases. Maybe emulating a an entire datacentre on a single dev workstation. Perhaps Graphic Designers who work on big animations. They use an entire SSD just to cache their active project.
These sorts of folks often have 4-8 disks in their "Home Server / Dev workstation." And rarely do they want to afford the cost of 10TB's of SSD's. Hence the need to balance &/or run NAS storage.
For them moving TB's of files is not a "one time thing"
Report Comment
 
 
# RE: What?Luay 2013-05-27 15:01
These professionals would know that there is an enterprise model offered by every single HDD manufacturer. Seagate Constellation and WD Enterprise come to mind.

These folks won't bother reading this review. That means I'm probably abusing you.
Report Comment
 
 
# RE: RE: What?David Lean 2013-05-28 04:58
Thanks for the clarification (& the abuse).
Over the years I've recommended the purchase of many 100's of enterprise class drives. Typically we only put them in servers. They cost more, if they aren't kept cool in an air-conditioned room can have a similar failure rate to the cheaper drives. So for developer workstations & technical home / demo systems, they get these style consumer drives.
Actually, These data centre folks, read all reviews.
Thanks for your thoughts.
Report Comment
 
 
# RE: 4TB Seagate Desktop HDD ST4000DM000Ed 2013-05-27 02:15
> Does it bother you that the 4TB Seagate Desktop HDD is a 5900 RPM hard drive?

Quite the opposite - it's a selling point. I have two Hitachi Deskstar 7K4000 4TB and I am disappointed with how hot and noisy they run. The lower RPM Seagate looks perfect.

Speed is a non-issue when we're talking about HDD's - they are all slow, and it is a moot point whether one is "less slow" than the other. The price of 4TB is such that your typical buyers will be higher end, non-budget, users who can afford SSD's. I will not compromise by using HDD's - you get the right tools for your requirements, and for speed, one goes with SSD.

What I need in my HDD's is quiet, low power "large capacity" active storage, in a relatively compact package, to accompay my fast SSD's.
Report Comment
 
 
# RE: 4TB Seagate Desktop HDD ST4000DM000Jeff 2013-05-28 06:55
I am someone who bought a box of these drives and then returned them once I tested a couple of them - due mostly to slow access times and low throughput, also I felt like it had been implied that they were 7,200 rpm drives like the ST3000DM000. I can't put drives in my customers machines that are slower than the drives they already have. Most of my people are working with large volumes of small files - lots of almost random I/O. If they had been marketed as 5,900 rpm drives I would not have bought them in the first place.

I am now putting Hitachi 7k4000's in most of my customer machines, with Constellation ES.3 or WD RE 4tb drives as an upgrade - these are for desktop machines with 4+ rotating drives and typically a 256gb SSD - which seems like a waste of money, but it appears to be the only way to get high capacity combined with reasonable access time.

Maybe the new WD SE series will be the way to go.

I am really disappointed that the 4TB Barracuda XT never seemed to appear other than in external drives destined for failure (with the access times crippled and no ventilation).
Report Comment
 

Comments have been disabled by the administrator.

Search Benchmark Reviews
QNAP Network Storage Servers

Follow Benchmark Reviews on FacebookReceive Tweets from Benchmark Reviews on Twitter