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AMD A10-6700 APU Richland Processor
Featured Reviews: Processors

AMD has a pattern when it comes to processor releases. They release a new processor, run it through its paces for a while, then they release more of the same die with higher clock speeds. Generally, though, the new processors release at something closer to the release price of the first series of processors. That is the one part of the equation missing from this summer's AMD APU releases. The AMD A10-6700 is the second processor coming out in June 2013 with an MSRP of $142. In this article, Benchmark Reviews is taking a detailed look at the A10-6700, especially its differences from the unlocked A10-6800K.

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AMD A10-6800K APU Richland Processor
Featured Reviews: Processors

So far, it seems that the early summer of 2013 is destined to be full of Intel Haswell coverage. Rather than consigning themselves to the shadows, AMD is quietly releasing two new members of their APU family. The next generation of APUs is being represented at the top by the A10-6800K and the A10-6700 Accelerated Processing Units, codenamed Richland. It has been about eight months since AMD released the last generation, Trinity APUs. When that happened, AMD took back the performance lead from Ivy Bridge in the sub-$150 CPU price range. This has been AMD's bread and butter for a while now, especially with their ability to pair discrete level graphics with their CPUs that totally decimate the onboard capabilities of their opponent. Haswell may change things, but for now, we'll see where AMD is setting the bar for entry-level performance. In this article, Benchmark Reviews takes a hard look at the third generation of AMD APUs with the top end AMD A10-6800K Richland Processor.

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Intel Core-i7 4770K Haswell Processor
Featured Reviews: Processors

After months of rumors and speculation, Intel's 4th generation Core CPUs, code-named Haswell, are here. Haswell CPUs are a "tock"-- that is, a new microarchitecture-- in Intel's "tick-tock" annual release cycle. Based on the same 22nm fabrication process and 3-D transistors introduced with last year's Ivy Bridge CPUs, Haswell brings with it a new socket 1150, which means that you can't just drop it in to replace an Ivy Bridge or Sandy Bridge CPU, since you'll need a new motherboard. But what new features and performance does Intel's Haswell processor bring with it? Let's find out.

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AMD FX-8350 Vishera Desktop Processor
Featured Reviews: Processors

AMD introduced its new FX-series processors almost exactly a year ago, and AMD enthusiasts hoped these Zambezi CPUs, built on AMD's new Bulldozer architecture, would provide real competition to Intel's Sandy Bridge line. But although the FX-8150 had eight integer cores and was capable of high clock speeds, its high price and poor performance at the individual core level meant that it wasn't very competitive with the equivalent Intel CPUs. Now we have the AMD FX-8350 CPU, code-named Vishera and based on the Piledriver architecture to test. Has AMD managed to reduce the performance deficit relative to Intel? Let's find out.

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AMD A8-5600K APU Trinity Desktop Processor
Featured Reviews: Processors

Right on track, well after Ivy Bridge, AMD has released their second generation of Accelerated Processing Units in the form of the Trinity series A10-5800K and the A8-5600K. Last week, we brought you a preview of these two APUs just to give you a taste of their gaming performance and some of their specifications. Today, at Benchmark Reviews, we are going in detail for a full work-over of the A8-5600K APU.

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AMD A10-5800K Trinity Desktop Processor
Featured Reviews: Processors

Right on track, well after Ivy Bridge, AMD has released their second generation of Accelerated Processing Units in the form of the Trinity series A10-5800K and the A8-5600K. Last week, we brought you a preview of these two APUs just to give you a taste of their gaming performance and some of their specifications. Today, at Benchmark Reviews, we are going in detail for a full work-over of the A10-5800K APU.

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AMD Trinity APU A10-5800K & A8-5600K Preview
Featured Reviews: Processors

Less than two days ago, Benchmark Reviews received the latest and greatest APUs from AMD; the A10-5800K and the A8-5600K. They don't launch in the retail market for a couple of weeks, but we are bringing you the low down in a special preview of the newest Accelerated Processing Units about to become available. The Second Generation APUs follow along the same lines as last year's APU releases by AMD with some notable upgrades in both CPU and GPU performance. The new "Trinity" series of APUs also comes with a new chipset and socket that are surprisingly not backwards compatible with the first generation "Llano" series of APUs.

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Intel Core i7-3770K Ivy Bridge Processor
Featured Reviews: Processors

Intel sticks to their "tick-tock" CPU development cycle, where the "ticks" represent new CPU architectures and the "tocks" represent process refinement. Sandy Bridge CPUs were the "tick", and the new Ivy Bridge CPUs are the "tock". Fabricated on a 22nm process with Intel's new low-leakage "3D" transistors, Ivy Bridge represents a fabrication breakthrough if nothing else. But how does it compare against the immensely popular and powerful Sandy Bridge CPUs? Benchmark Reviews dives into the fray to let you know.

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Intel Core i7-3820 Extreme Edition CPU
Featured Reviews: Processors

Not quite a year after Intel released Sandy Bridge with the new LGA-1155 platform they upped the performance bar again. This time around, the Sandy Bridge-E LGA-2011 platform is bigger, faster, and represents the top-of-the-line for consumer computing. Intel "Extreme Edition" processors have always brought out the best that the company has to offer, but the Extreme moniker isn't limited to the performance. The price of Extreme Edition CPUs generally matches, with the highest end of these clocking in near $1000. The LGA-2011 platform offers a lot in terms of performance computing, besides just the Extreme Edition CPUs, though. You also get a full 40 PCI-E lanes and quad-channel memory compatibility. So what about those of us that don't need a $1000 CPU, but we still want to use three or four GPUs to their full potential? For that, we have the Intel i7-3820 3.6GHz CPU. In this article, Benchmark Reviews goes under the hood of the littlest Sandy Bridge-E processor.

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